• Drunk Napoleon

    What did we watch?

    • Drunk Napoleon

      Community, Season One, Episode Twenty-Three, “Modern Warfare”
      “Come with me if you don’t want paint on your clothes.”

      “I thought it was paint, but I’m just bleeding!”

      Here we go, the god damned paintball episode! Looking at where it’s placed in the season, it actually makes a lot of sense that this particular episode would appear here. The next episode is arguably the climax, as certain secrets come out and the group has to pass their final exam, and the episode after that is a denouement summing up the characters and their journey. Having what’s basically a Treehouse Of Horror episode that seems to step away from the normal logic of the show makes sense, like we’re taking a fun break before Shit Gets Real.

      At the same time, this is clearly the direction the show will go down. @Ruck said that Harmon feeds off fan feedback, and while he’s not stupid enough to make every episode a paintball episode, I can see why he’d double down on the concept episodes like he would next season. Greendale and these characters are so well-established that we can now see how they’d fit into the movie parody (it makes complete sense that Chang would be a maniacal supervillain going full John Woo on everybody, but also there’s Leonard yelling “You suck!”).

      Justin Lin, best known for the Fast And The Furious franchise (really doubling down on alliterating the letter ‘F’ right now for some reason), brings sincerity to the proceedings – the actions scenes are legitimately exciting and the cliche moments like Abed noticing the paint sliding down the wall (my favourite joke) have all the emotional weight of the ‘real’ moments.

      As a bonus, the actual story of the episode is great too, which again is a huge part of what makes Community so beloved. It actually begins in a normal reality, with the group frustrated by Jeff and Britta’s sexual tension; during the paintball game, Jeff and Britta are both fulfilling the whole ‘sexual tension’ thing AND legitimately arguing over whether or not Britta’s niceness is fakery. I like the conclusion they come to – Jeff admitting he was projecting his insecurity onto her genuineness, and Britta admiring Jeff for helping people more than she ever does even though he doesn’t want to, something I legitimately admire Jeff for (in an ideal world, I’d be allowed to help people while being allowed to gripe about it the way Jeff does).

      Neon Genesis Evangelion, Episode Twenty-Three, “Rei III”
      We begin, once again, by wrapping up the events of last episode, as Asuka falls into a Shinji-esque funk, skipping school, running away to Hikari’s house, and playing video games all night. She apologises to Hikari for what she’s doing and admits that she feels valueless without her Eva and hates herself; unlike yesterday’s episode of SU, this does affect me, because while I already knew that, it’s tied into behaviour I’ve been watching for a dozen or so episodes.

      When another Angel attacks, Asuka is sent in to back up Rei, but she’s so depressed that when the Angel grabs and tries to infect Rei, her sync ratio won’t connect and she’s forced to retreat. Rei is given a vision in which she speaks to the Angel, the same way Shinji and Asuka did (though much less violent than the latter); this vision is surprisingly un-Brakhage-esque, as she simply speaks to a copy of herself. Both Rei and the Angel sense loneliness in each other, which Rei denies; the Angel persists in offering to ‘become one with’ Rei, which is exactly the terms Shinji’s visions used when offering to fuck him. When Shinji is sent in to rescue Rei (much to the despair of Asuka, who received no such thing last episode), Rei chooses instead to take the Angel within her and blow her and it the fuck up.

      Shinji’s grief has reached the point where he admits he can’t even cry anymore, and when Misato tries to reach out to him he literally pulls back and refuses to be touched. To his delight, it turns out Rei is alive, but she remembers nothing and simply cryptically describes herself as “the third one”; she finds Gendo’s glasses in her room and destroys them. This all becomes horribly clarified when, after quietly losing her mind in the background, Ritsuko calls Shinji and brings him into work. Misato, having gone through the capsule Kaji gave her, catches them and demands to see whatever she’s about to show him, which Ritsuko cheerfully agrees to.

      It turns out, Rei is simply one of dozens upon dozens of clones, and the extra clones are used to power the Dummy System. I know the weirdness of what I’m about to say here: the sight of so many nude teenage girls in a giant test tube is already eerie, and it’s made moreso by their cheerful smiling faces. Ritsuko, caught up in old-school Poe-style madness brought on partly by jealousy for Gendo, explains that there is a human soul inside each Eva, and that the Rei clones are soulless monstrosities created by man trying to control a god. She destroys them.

      Just like the Toji thing, the episode never actually comes out and says “this Rei is the third Rei, with the first being choked to death by Dr Ikagi and the second dying here”, though Rei III herself comes close.

      The Matrix Revolutions
      “At the bottom of this elevator, there is a coat-check girl, and if we’re lucky, a man for checking weapons.”
      “And if we’re unlucky?”
      “There will be many men.”

      “How old are you, kid?”
      “Eighteen.”
      “Shoulda said sixteen, I mighta believed that.”

      Revisiting this film again, it was a surprise to discover it’s actually fairly dramatically solid, at least internally; the only ideas allowed to actually flower are the Zion characters and, weirdly, the Merovingian. Starting with those Zion characters, they actually get a basic dramatic interplay that’s allowed to play out, as both Kid and Zee find their own heroism in defending Zion; the flaw is that we saw these characters for like one scene in the second one, and all the original flavour characters are elsewhere, which I think is why the battle for Zion is so boring (I feel like this would have been relieved by crosscutting between Neo/Trinity, Niobe/Morpheus, and Zion).

      Regarding the Merovingian, we meet a program who paid him to smuggle his daughter into the Matrix, and through him we learn both about program society in general and the Merovingian’s place within it specifically. It all actually does sound like a pretty cool idea, and I wished we could spend some time within it beyond a guy monologuing about it.

      In general, I get the sense that the Wachowskis are kind of sick of writing this story, and I think that feeds into both the story’s dramatic setup (my single favourite moment in the trilogy is when the Merovingian gives them a fetch quest and Trinity tells him to shove it up his ass) and the way it ends up skipping over that dramatic setup (Neo basically gets the next step in his quest from meditating and getting a vision, and ends up getting random superpowers just to move the story along).

      I love how, if allowed to go long enough, a story will develop its own language; the characters spend a lot of time literally quoting themselves and each other, but there are also moments like Trinity trying the sweeping floor kick it trip a guy and, to her own bafflement, failing because he can change gravity (which leads her to doing her famous flying kick).

      Noe and Smith’s final fight has no dramatic or story power whatsoever; we’re just slamming the unstoppable force against the immovable object. Nevertheless, it still entrances me as an adult, and I think it’s mainly down to the ownage on display. That said, I’ve always loved most of their final dialogue, particularly Smith’s monologue.

      (note to self, put Smith’s speech here, if you’re reading this then I forgot to do that)

      I believe Neo has the vague outline of an arc throughout the sequels: he fights to save humanity, he discovers the One thing is a fraud, he suffers a crisis of faith, he ends up choosing to fight anyway because that’s what he wants to do.

      Steven Universe, Episode Twenty-Three, “Joking Victim”
      I have to give this show credit for how consistent the morality has become, to the point that I have to kind of admire it. Steven hangs out with Sadie for the day, and discovers she has a crush on Lars; when they discover he blew off work to hang out with the Cool Kids (endearingly, they’re all jumping on a trampoline), together they hatch a scheme to prank him with magic, and of course it goes horribly wrong and Lars ends up breathing fire (and from the sounds of it getting severe throat burns). It’s resolved when Sadie admits her feelings to Lars, giving Steven a second to think and use something from his training video.

      So much of the morality of this show, as we’ve said, comes from people not confronting one another, and it’s interesting to me that this plot was caused, in part, by Sadie not telling Lars her feelings until it was way too late, and when he finds out he reaches out to her. It’s strange to me that twice now, what I would consider a normal plot (certainly a normal subplot in, say, Community) is applied to the show’s designated Asshole – Lars has so far made more attempts at amends than, say, Amethyst (who even helps cause the plot and wanders around watching it indifferently). Only Lars has to grow?

      • lgauge

        There’s a guy named Lars on that show? Now I’m (very slightly) intrigued.

        • Drunk Napoleon

          Yeah, for some reason Lars Von Trier is running around Beach City.

          • lgauge

            *whispers* That’s also my name.

          • Nice to meet you, Mr. Von Trier!

          • lgauge

            I’d stay and chat, but I have some existential angst and self-loathing to manifest into a great film about a suffering woman.

          • lgauge

            Back-up joke: No no, Mr. Von Trier is my father (please send help).

          • My back-up joke was “Nice to meet you, Mr. Beach City!”

          • The Narrator

            Pies don’t have legs and thus can’t run, @tristannankervis:disqus .

          • Drunk Napoleon

            He gets carried around by his best friend, the killer robot driving instructor.

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/ca999fd7ab0ef15999650de107e128835b8b68fbcacc2abb936f4e8f2fb2938d.jpg

      • The Ploughman

        I remember now that possibly my greatest disappointment with Revolutions, aside from the fact that none of the action scenes hold their own against the first two, is the complete backseating of Morpheus. He’s the instigator of the whole shebang and by the end he’s reduced to Proud Dad of a billion freed people.

        Speaking of which, while I think some of the questions about Zion are amusing but irrelevant (where did they get all that metal and how do they process it?) I do think the repercussions of crashing the Matrix are given short shrift. How do you deal with literally a planet of people with sudden identity crises? What will they do? Mine for more metal? Fuck you, Morpheus, in the Matrix I was a cardiologist.

    • Delirious – I fancied some more John Candy after immersing myself back into Summer Rental for my article the other day, and this was on Netflix. It’s not his best work, in fact Candy’s character was possibly my least favourite part of the film (he has to do a LOT of saying things out loud in empty rooms, because he’s a writer I guess) but the story finds him sucked into the soap opera that he writes, and the entire supporting cast get to do that hammy over-the-top soap opera acting which I find endlessly amusing, so I was pretty solidly entertained. Possibly the best soapy subplot is about Dylan Baker slowly falling to pieces, after being drugged by his sister – some unexpectedly horrible FX! And also his grotesque appearance leads to lots of stellar face-acting from David Rasche.

    • Fresno Bob

      A couple of episodes of 30 Rock Season Five.

      And, David Lynch comes back to Twin Peaks as director, and the dark weirdness returns, as we learn who’s housing BOB and a terrible fate claims another Victim.
      https://media.tenor.com/images/2550bac86c9dfdf5c2cba45829a8594e/tenor.gif

    • The Narrator

      I had two thematic double-features for the price of one-and-a-half last night.

      Waking the Dead: This starts off pretty chilly and, even more damningly, pretty cartoonish in its depiction of the 70s (one of the first scenes we get there is a wide-angle shot of a “hippie” publishing company, whose office looks like some Clockwork Orange nightmare, while “Maggie May” plays) and 70s idealism. But thankfully it eventually builds into a pretty compelling romance and psychological drama, led by a really good performance by Billy Crudup (his climactic breakdown scene is really powerful). I will admit that it’s definitely the least of the “Billy Crudup in the 70s” movies I’ve seen thus far (and I’m still missing a few; dear god, is he trying to tell us something or what?).

      Solaris ’02: This and Waking the Dead (which would have been a pretty good title for this if they wanted to hide the remake factor) share the same premise, and even the same structure in telling that premise. But while this movie is the one so frequently talked about being cold or dispassionate or whatever, this remains an absolute emotional bulldozer for me. That it also includes that hilarious scene of Jeremy Davies laying out a big plan that’s almost literally just “bitches get shit done” is a plus.

      20th Century Women w/ Mike Mills commentary: Speaking of emotional bulldozers and 70s Billy Crudup. My first viewing since theaters, improbably (although I’ve thought so much about it since then you could replay a near-complete version of the movie from my thoughts). The commentary was more technical than personal, maybe surprisingly, but Mills is still an engaging presence and quick to praise seemingly everyone involved with the movie but himself (especially the actors, which, hey, I totally agree). I did learn some facts about the production, including the influence of Jane Campion’s Bright Star and (I’m ashamed I didn’t pick up on this on either of my first two viewings) Gordon Willis’s work with Woody Allen on the lighting and that the motel where the characters stay at the end was the same one where [the thing happens that involves] Annette Bening in The Grifters, and I also got to hear Mills call some skate tricks in the movie “period-correct and just rad”. I will say that even watching the movie from a seemingly safe distance proved pretty emotionally overwhelming, and I’ve found myself mournfully playing over the Buzzcocks’ “Why Can’t I Touch It?” in my head since this. God, this movie fucking rules.

    • Simpsons: Duffless – A fun little episode that founders only because the following week Homer was back to his old drinking ways. And maybe because the A and B plots live on different planes. Otherwise a sweet little 22 minutes with a goodly amount of jokes and references, mainly A Clockwork Orange.

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        The B plot to this one is “Is my brother dumber than a hamster?”?

        • Yup. Cute, but it over-rewards Bart for his misbehavior.

    • jroberts548

      Game of thrones, episode 3. The logistical stuff this season is bad. It’s really bad. I can accept dragons and ice zombies and so on, but come on. Two ambush attacks have completely wiped out Dany’s allies in Westeros? Everyone can sail from dragon stone to the west coast with ease? You can bring your army hundreds of miles on foot in a sneak attack, and, with no siege engines apparent, capture a city?

      For real world comparisons, the battle lepanto had more than 200 ships on each side. The Turkish fleet was wiped out, yet they still had more ships afterward than the pro-Dany ironborn. The Italian fleet had a massive, one-sided victory, yet they still more ships than euron.

      I also have some doubts about Jaime’s continued loyalty to Cersei after last season, but I can wait for more explanation of his interiority.

      • Miller

        I had similar complaints about the fleet and was told (haven’t rewatched to verify) that Euron mentions splitting his fleet, so the ambush near Dragonstone and the ambush at Casterly Rock are two different units. Still annoying and bullshit though, like pretty much everything Euron.

        • jroberts548

          How does he have such a huge fleet though?

        • jroberts548

          If they explained that euron had magic boats, I could accept that. But this is even bigger bullshit that Ramsey being able to take out stannis’s army’s supplies in a secret Guerilla raid.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        I honestly buy that Jaime at least can tell himself that he’s eternally loyal to her. It’s as much about denial as a deep, horrible love.

    • Delmars Whiskers

      Charlottesville: Race And Terror–The Vice documentary that gives the lie to everything said by the…*heavy sigh*…President Of The United States. Essential viewing, but it kind of made me give up all hope for the human race.

    • Son of Griff

      THE BREAKFAST CLUB– My initial plan for my YitM piece was to launch a full out attack on this movie, which was one of a handful of films that I’ve used, when the opportunity arose, to exemplify the worst trends of 80s American cinema. Turns out, on rewatch, some of my intended comments related to its datedness in style and music, seem completely wrong headed. It’s quite specific to its time and place, but minimizes the ephemeral nature of the decade’s youth culture by utilizing costumes and architecture in very smart ways. While the attention to detail contributes to the broader philosophical problems I have with the film, specifically those relating to gender and pretensions to universalize the teenage experience, these issues seem organically connected to a style that welds Stanislovskian naturalism to classical Hollywood genres of integration, such as the musical and domestic melodrama. John Hughes creates a powerful iconic presence with his cast, particularly Molly Ringwald, Anthony Michael Hall (his muses) and even Emilio Estevez. I basically made a 120-135 degree turn on this.

      • BurgundySuit

        This may be the only time I’ll ever hear John Hughes described as Stanislovskian.

  • lgauge

    How dare you suggest that A-ha went away in a day? They had a whole bunch of hits for years to come after this one… [Said no one outside of Norway :sadface:]

    • They had plenty of hits in the UK too. The Sun Always Shines on TV was the only one that topped the charts, and I quite like that one too, although not as much since U2 ripped it off so horribly for Beautiful Day and ruined it slightly, due to Bono Association. I’d have put Take on Me top for ’85, but I’ve never been much of a Springsteen fan.

  • Just been looking at the list of 1985 hits and it was a pretty weak year (for my tastes) – most of my 80s favourites apparently came earlier or later in the decade. Surprised there’s no Madonna on this list though, Into The Groove would be way up there for me.

    • Also I’ve always loved this song, which was a UK hit in 85 but not so much anywhere else:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8I8mWG6HlmU

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        This is pretty much a perfect rock song. How was it The Cult didn’t have more hits?

        • To be honest I only really know this one and Destroy The Heart, but if those two are any indication they should be better remembered. Maybe I should put my ears where my mouth is and actually listen to more of their stuff…

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            I think this was their biggest one, but radio stations used to play “Rain” and “Fire Woman” quite a bit, too. And I’ve heard a few more on Sirius 1st Wave.

          • Just checking these out. They have such a distinctive guitar sound, it’s extremely 80s but still sounds pretty great.

            Also I’ve just realised that Destroy The Heart was a totally different band (House of Love) and I’ve got my slightly goth-leaning-rock-bands-with-chorus-pedals crossed.

        • The utter impossibility of saying this title out loud? (I’ve been trying all morning.)

          • BurgundySuit

            At least she wasn’t by the seashore.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            Thinking about it some more, I do the same thing, but now I need to find a use for the title “Seashell Sanctuary.”

        • Rosy Fingers

          Mostly because their other songs were like this:
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CosK7kLxgEY

        • thesplitsaber

          Rick Rubin revamped theyre sound, then took that exact same sound and applied it to Glenn Danzig.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            I do think “Mother” is a pretty badass song, too.

          • thesplitsaber

            I would recommend the first 3 Danzig records. If you can get passed the cheese they are expe3rtly crafted simple hard rock albums.

    • BurgundySuit

      I just do not have the Madonna Gene.

    • BurgundySuit

      If I did have to pick one (out of the five – FIVE! that charted that year), it would have been that one. Maybe Crazy for You. Definitely not Material Girl.

      • Yeah, Material Girl is pretty annoying. Not sure I’ve even heard Gambler. Crazy For You and Into The Groove are both pretty great. I’m not the biggest Madonna fan but she’s definitely had a few top-level pop songs.

      • thesplitsaber

        was live to tell 1985? Massively underrated song from an underrated movie. (by the director of…ugh 50 shades darker.)

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IzAO9A9GjgI

        • BurgundySuit

          Didn’t chart.

    • Rosy Fingers

      In Australia, 1985 was all about Hoodoo Gurus, Midnight Oil and Paul Kelly, in our house at least.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNNHEZzBDZk

  • lgauge

    Also, in case anyone here is interested, there’s going to be a sale on Masters of Cinema today, starting in a bit more than an hour:
    https://twitter.com/mastersofcinema/status/898095323981242368

    • Ooh!

    • Fresno Bob

      Are they all Region 2?

      • I think some of them are region free, but as is the mysterious way of the DVD / blu-ray seller, they don’t seem to actually say which ones anywhere. You’d think that would be a selling point.

        • lgauge

          Checking the corresponding Amazon (uk) page might yield that information.

    • Hmm – “a massive range” turns out to be 28 titles, a lot of which aren’t actually part of the Masters of Cinema range. Oh well. I’m still tempted by a couple…

      • lgauge

        Yeah, I’m quite disappointed. I had selected 7 MoC titles that I was interested to buy for the sale, but none were featured.

        • It’s only 28 if you include DVD and blu-ray releases of things separately too! Think they over-hyped it a bit.

          I’ll probably grab Dragon Inn as I’ve wanted to see that for a while but that’ll most likely be all.

          • lgauge

            I already bought that one in a previous sale I think. I’ll try to get Shoa and Four Films After Shoa though. Seems appropriate in these times we’re living in and who doesn’t want to feel bad?

          • lgauge

            I’m really struggling with the site though. Seems like their servers can’t handle the pressure.

          • Yeah, same.

  • Miller

    Obligatory: Noted cultural critic George Will on Born In The USA http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/388281/george-will-boss-thirty-years-ago-michael-r-strain

    • BurgundySuit

      “He is no whiner, and the recitation of closed factories and other problems always seems punctuated by a grand, cheerful affirmation: “Born in the USA!”
      lolololol

    • The Ploughman

      Bahaha! I will unironically say that I love George F Will, the squarest man alive.

    • thesplitsaber

      wonder what will would have thought of the original version https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UBei3n4FOY

      • BurgundySuit

        Holy fucking shit, this is haunting.

        • thesplitsaber

          It was originally recorded for the accoustic Nebraska album. Why he decided to change it so much i have no idea (his way of singing the chorus for example is way more powerful in this version.)

  • pico79

    I think my own list might switch in Sade, “Sweetest Taboo” (ugh her voice is so good), something from Whitney Houston’s debut album, and maybe Grace Jones’ “Slave to the Rhythm.”

    It wasn’t a particularly great year.

    • BurgundySuit

      Thanks!

    • BurgundySuit

      Those two probably could have made it on here, but neither of them cracked the Hot 100.

      • pico79

        Ah, my bad.

    • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

      The list of the top 100 from 1985 has some songs worth mentioning, even though there aren’t a ton of favorites on it:

      http://www.bobborst.com/popculture/top-100-songs-of-the-year/?year=1985

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        Artists or songs I’d at least mention, even if I wasn’t necessarily a huge fan:

        Wham! (Three songs on there, all of which deserve it)
        Madonna (Goes without saying)
        Phil Collins (“Sussudio” is the well remembered one here, but “Don’t Lose That Number” deserves mention)
        Whitney Houston – “Saving All My Love For You” in particular
        Howard Jones – “Things Can Only Get Better”
        Katrina and the Waves – “Walking on Sunshine”
        Don Henley – There’s a certain cheesiness to him, but both these songs were too big not to talk about
        Power Station – “Some Like It Hot” (Look, I just really like Power Station; how could anyone not like Robert Palmer fronting Duran Duran’s musicians?)
        Debarge – “Rhythm of the Night” (They have another charting song but I’ve never heard of it)
        Simple Minds – “Don’t You Forget About Me” (well, I assume this will come up if/when we talk The Breakfast Club)
        Ready for the World – “Oh Sheila”
        Aretha Franklin – “Freeway of Love” (no explanation needed)
        Animotion – “Obsession” (me and my synth-pop…)

        I didn’t mention a few bands (Duran Duran, Hall and Oates, Stevie Wonder) because I didn’t think this year showcased their best stuff. Tempted to mention John Mellencamp but it would be much better if we could pair “Pink Houses” with “Born in the U.S.A.”

        And I’d do some kind of double feature on “Miami Vice Theme” / “Axel F.”

        • BurgundySuit

          There’s a good reason you never heard that other DeBarge song. It’s baaaad.

        • BurgundySuit

          Arethawise, I prefer Who’s Zooming Who, mostly for the backup singers.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            Hmm, I guess I need to familiarize myself with it.

        • The Ploughman

          “Walkin’ on Sunshine” could appear on the best of and worst of lists and I would agree both times.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            Written by Kimberley Rew, former guitarist for the Soft Boys, one of the true greats of the post-punk era (and which doesn’t nearly enough get their due).

  • BurgundySuit

    Year of the Month with Uncle Roger: Heaven Help Us
    http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/heaven-help-us-1985

    If you remember those little clickers that the nuns used to use, you’ll know why I liked the beginning of “Heaven Help Us” so much – and why I had such mixed feelings about the rest of it. The clickers were dime store crickets that made a nice, loud click, perfect for signaling a First Communion class so all the kids would stand up at the same time, and kneel at the same time, and start filing down the aisle together. In an opening scene of the movie, a kid has his own clicker, and uses it to sabotage the nun’s signals, so that the whole class is bobbing like a yo-yo.

    I thought that was funny, and I thought it set the tone for an affectionate, nostalgic, funny look back at Catholic school education in Brooklyn of the 1960s…

    Unfortunately, what the movie turns into is more like a cross between “Stalag 17” and “Porky’s,” as sadistic teachers beat every, last glimmer of spirit out of students, and kids establish new indoor records in self-abuse…

    The strange thing about the movie is the way the moments of inspiration raise our hopes, and then disappoint them. Take the scene where the school plays host to the nearby Catholic girls’ school at a dance. The boys and girls are lined up on opposite sides of the room, and then an earnest little priest (Wallace Shawn, from “My Dinner With Andre”) stands up on the stage and delivers a lecture on The Evils of Lust, gradually warming to his subject. The idea of the scene is funny, and it has a certain amount of underlying truth (I remember a priest once warning my class, “Never touch yourselves, boys” – without telling us where). But Shawn’s speech climbs to such a hysterical pitch that it goes over the top, and the humor is lost; it simply becomes weird behavior.

  • thesplitsaber

    ‘ Allee Willis originally had the song in mind for Streets of Fire,’

    Fittingly it wasnt used, nor was the titular track by Bruce Springsteen who also wrote one of the Pointers first big hits

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCOBp1Lrlf4