• Drunk Napoleon

    What did we watch?

    • Drunk Napoleon

      LOST, Season Two, Episode 16, “The Whole Truth”
      “Do Jack and Locke know about this?”
      “Jack and Locke are a little too worried about Locke and Jack.”

      “Morning! You wants breakfast? I have papayas, and papayas.”

      Our main story here is Sun discovering she’s pregnant; the flashbacks become integral beyond vague character beats, because they reveal information Sun would otherwise have no reason to bring up to anyone. I enjoy the recycling of the hotel son dude to teach her English, lending the story further weight. Jin’s behaviour can be seen as him falling back onto bad habits. Ordinarily, I hate stories that are about people being obsessed with biologically related children – my dad is not biologically related to me, a completely meaningless fact – but this episode manages to justify it. If Sun and Jin adopted a child, that would give her father an out.

      The pregnancy thing also contributes to the mythology. After the industrial/scientific approach to childbirth, we now have an explicitly mystical approach to it as Sun now magically conceives. Again, relying on my gut instinct, there’s the feeling that the island is a magical place that the Others (and possibly Dharma?) are trying to rationally explain and control. As far as I remember, the show steps back from that completely and makes it one form of spiritualism versus another, which was disappointing. On the other hand, that happening felt like a definitive answer to “faith vs rationalism”.

      There’s an early cameo of Widmore Labs, it being the brand of pregnancy test Sun uses.

      The episode ends with Ben fucking with Locke and Jack’s heads – I’m struck by his use of the phrase “These people you seem to think are your enemies”, because while it’s as carefully chosen as anything else he says, it’s the one place where he tips his hand.

      Book Club: Sawyer reads Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, and deems it predictable.
      Ownage: N/A

      NaNoWriMo Update: Still too slow, but I’m keeping a steady pace.

      • Son of Griff

        I liked the way that the Judy Blume reference in 20TH CENTURY WOMEN got shoe-horned in myself.

    • There’s Always Tomorrow – my long-overdue first trip into the world of Douglas Sirk. I really enjoyed this, it delivers all the sensitive, nuanced melodrama I’d been led to expect, with the familiar chemistry between Stanwyck and MacMurray being a welcome bonus. There are a few elements that felt dated (perhaps because this is a remake of a film from the 30s?) but the general telling of the tale was captivating.

      The Good Place, chapters 12 and 13 – OK, that is a pretty audacious season finale. I’m still feeling like this is a show I’ll never love as much as some people do, but that ending has definitely encouraged me to stick with it for at least a little while longer.

      NaSoAlMo update: my brain seems to have kicked into gear! I wrote and recorded a sort of broken love song (and used a robotic speech synth for the chorus!), and this morning I had another lyric idea, so I guess this is actually happening.

      • Son of Griff

        THERE’S ALWAYS TOMORROW gets overlooked in the canon of Sirk melodramas for some reason, and its just as good as the others in my opinion. Wait ’till you get to THE TARNISHED ANGELS, where Faulkner gets the “burned to a crisp and bloody as hell” treatment.

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        I KNEW it!

    • ZoeZ

      The Way He Looks: Per @drunknapoleon:disqus’s recommendation. This was pretty adorable and also nicely nuanced, with characters who have flaws that aren’t neatly overcome in an hour and a half and with a good, textured understanding of the different kinds of jealousies and teenage posturing. This is very clearly a segment of Leonardo’s life–his first love story–and I like how there’s other stuff going on throughout (you could presumably have a whole separate movie about Katrina, who is more complex in the film than the other characters tend to see her) that isn’t resolved because it’s not part of that story even though it coexists with it.

    • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

      The Babysitter Dir. McG
      Dude… The director is credited as “McG”!!! what??!
      This is not very good. Like a movie that was first conceived as a series of memes, and then padded out to full length. The exuberance of the evil jock character did win me over, however, but that’s like fifteen minutes of the movie.

      Jigsaw Dir. Those brothers that also made Predestination
      Yeah this is a work for hire job if i’ve ever seen it. Just what you’d expect from a Saw movie except its far more tasteful than the gore/torture of the previous entries. Which, i mean, what do you think we came for? Anyways the final 20 minutes of any saw movie are my favorite as the score amps up to one-thousand and the film pretends our minds are being blown at a rate faster than the speed of light. Also the new killer is great. Just the right amount of asshole holier than thou genius without being obnoxious. I totally love the fact they he WAS THERE THE WHOLE TIME!!!!!!!!! Yeah, if for some reason you are as committed to this series as I am, sure whatever. Par for the course.

      Edge of Seventeen Dir. Kelly Fremon Craig
      Everybody else: This movie is FANTASTIC!!
      Me: I’ll watch it later….

      1 year later

      Me: Yeah this movie is fantastic…

      • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

        Jigsaw plot question for those who were paying more attention: Also did anyone understand the cancer diagnosis thing? I know it happened in the past, but i’m trying to figure out just what the deal was with that. Like why did it come up?

      • I really liked Predestination, in an “I’m down with whatever these guys do next!” kinda way. Typical that what they’d do next is the eighth entry in a franchise I’ve never been interested in. Way to test my faith, Spierig Brothers.

        • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

          Yeah that movie is a good high concept thriller with a fantastic performance anchoring the whole thing. With Jigsaw, when the movie starts, I was excited as the film had the appearance of a far more cinematic nature, but eventually the T.V. CSI crime procedural style takes hold and it just looks whatever.

        • Defense Against The Dark Arts

          Predestination doesn’t get the love it deserves. It’s tailor made for a cult following along the lines of Donnie Darko or Primer.

          • I guess it doesn’t have the cult-ready soundtrack or the inspirationally-low budget, but it’s such a satisfying, emotional bit of sci-fi. And Sarah Snook is sensational in it, seriously one of my favourite performances ever.

          • Jake Gittes

            I’m still waiting for Snook to break out in a big way. She’s been doing okay in character roles since then but I mean c’mon. Her in Predestination is one of the great “Who is THAT?!” turns of recent times.

          • Yeah, same here. I’ve just seen that she’s in the next Spierig Brothers film, so hopefully that will provide a more substantial role.

          • (although I’ve just watched the trailer and it looks like a fairly standard-issue haunted house film, albeit with Helen Mirren in the lead which is quite interesting)

          • Miller

            This is making me pine for Helen Mirren as a Scooby-Doo villain.

          • This new film is about the Winchester Mystery House, which I hadn’t heard of before but appears to be the most Scooby-Doo thing ever.

          • Miller

            Ooh, interesting. The Winchester House (or its non-legally-actionable equivalent) showed up in a creepy Moore/Veitch Swamp Thing comic.

          • The Ploughman

            Hey, it’s on Amazon prime! Watchlisted.

          • clytie

            Same.

      • McG is also responsible for the Charlie’s Angels movies.

        • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

          Is any of his other stuff better? I sort of have the same inherently negative opinion of any director (well first impression i guess) who doesn’t just throw up their full name or uses a jokey pen name (ex: Pitof, Olivier Megaton) instead. I guess that is a sort of weird thing to be bothered by.

          • The Ploughman

            He is as he is named. Stylish, with barely enough substance to be visible.

          • I have friends who really like the first Charlie’s Angel movie? One of my best friends in college said she loved it because it was such an unabashed male fantasy of women and because the women were so badass in a fantastical light. She also liked The Sweetest Thing for many of the same reasons. They were both part of the could-be-a-satire-of-but-probably-just-is-a male jack off fantasy of strong feminist women canon.

          • Conor Malcolm Crockford

            This is also why I like Barbarella! The women I were with really liked it too to the point that Longworth’s obvious distaste for it on YMRT was a bit strange. The movie’s just too ridiculous to nurse much of a grudge about.

        • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

          I believe he has a solid CV of hip-hop/R&B music videos as well.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            Nope, it’s an, uh, record of 90s alt-rock songs, covering the whole spectrum from Korn to Fastball to Sugar Ray to Smash Mouth.

            Also, he’s white, which blew my mind.

            I’m starting to think I may have had him confused with F. Gary Gray.

      • McG is like every 90s stereotype distilled into a single person: http://www.indiewire.com/2014/02/5-iconic-90s-music-videos-directed-by-mcg-88852/

        • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

          oh lord he directed a smash mouth music video…

          • Some body once told you
            McG is gonna roll you
            Not the sharpest films in the shed
            Movies lookin’ kinda dumb
            Bad action plots with guns
            They’re so bad, they’ll make you wish that you’re dead.

        • He’s the McGintiest!

          • silverwheel

            McG: “Rough neighborhood.”

            Crow: “But I wouldn’t want to direct here.”

      • Jake Gittes

        I hated the new killer in Jigsaw. Sure let’s go with the one new character who’s bland as fuck. Not that I expected this franchise to be properly resurrected from here in the first place, but I just don’t care any way about this guy and what he does. But then the movie didn’t help itself any by being so nakedly desperate to bring back Tobin Bell even for 10 minutes that it didn’t even bother to mask the twist – the timelines so obviously don’t match up from the start and it feels like the movie just wants you to roll with it anyway. If they had actually literally allowed Jigsaw to come back to life in the present, they would have completely abandoned reality, but at least it’d be honest.

        • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

          Yeah i can see how someone could feel that way. He was like an evil ER character, but i do love his malevolent TV villain turn at the end. Happy they found a reason to keep incorporating Tobin Bell, but my love for shameless sequel engineering in the context of schlocky horror franchises knows no bounds. Also it allowed them a longer montage of “what really happened!” at the end which is my favorite. The girl really might have been a better choice, but honestly she will probably join in later anyways. How’d you feel about the traps (i’m assuming you have stake in this series), aside from the ridiculous sand pit i was disappointed.

          • Jake Gittes

            The traps weren’t too interesting for sure. They also seemed way more high-tech than what Jigsaw would have been able to come up with a decade ago, more evidence of the movie’s conceptual failure where it wants to be slick and modern and 2017 but can’t separate itself from the past.

        • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

          Also the twist is the same concept of IV and III so yeah good job diversifying
          But I’m so bad as guessing twist endings (I was floored at the end of Interstellar while everyone i saw it with was like “called it!”) this series ALWAYS gets me on some level. Even if its just giddy absurdity.

          • Jake Gittes

            It reminded me the most of II, with the different timelines. Except there it had me fooled, here there’s no going around the fact that things aren’t matching up at all so I was just like “Okay, spill it already”.

          • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

            That is a better example, as i was thinking of the reverse of III and IV’s ideas where it turns out they’re happening at the same time. Yeah i did get the timeline thing before the ending, but the setup is so light I knew something else would be askew when it starts spilling its guts. Definitely since for a long period it becomes a who-dun-it.

      • Miller

        Ha, had a similar experience with Edge of Seventeen. How great are Steinfeld and Harrelson together?

        • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

          Good enough for a multi-season sitcom. I’d watch that.

    • Skipped the visual in favor of the sound of another Knicks comeback win and following the NY Times and 538 election blogs. Was nice to have everyone I was rooting for win.

      • Miller

        Eh, I agree with him on the issues but I don’t know if Jeff Hornacek has the political acumen to be governor of New Jersey.

        • Can’t be worse than Christie! According to Maddow, he left office as least popular governor in any state in American history!

          Also, he got into shouting match with voter next to him in line at polls because of course he did.

    • Jake Gittes

      Eyes Wide Shut, for the first time. Kubrick’s control of his powers at this stage of his career is so absolute and assured that he never needs to show off, which combined with the subject matter results in a film that feels simultaneously rigorous and playful; he knows exactly what he wants to do and how he wants to do it, but the resulting work is inviting rather than closed-off. I was enjoying myself every step of the way. The presentation is unintrusive and slightly distanced, which gives room for performances to grab attention; they are neither naturalistic nor over-the-top, just heightened, an “ecstatic truth” kind of acting that’s exactly right. Thanks to these qualities of the directing and acting, scenes like Alice’s sailor story, Marion’s out-of-nowhere love confession and even the orgy itself are absolutely mesmerizing, yet, once they end, there’s a slight feeling of unreality, of “Wait, did that actually just happen?”, that’s perfectly appropriate for the story of a man who thinks he has his whole world figured out, only to be broken out of his bubble.

      It strikes me – and then it strikes me as ironic – that two of the most famously divisive and controversial movies of 1999, this and Fight Club, share a message that essentially boils down to “Don’t worry, be happy”; to their credit, they recognize what kind of work it can take getting there, each in its own fiercely idiosyncratic way. Since I know firsthand that most Kubrick films get even better on rewatch, I wondered for a bit how that would work for this one, considering it derives much of its in-the-moment intrigue from the sense of mystery surrounding the orgy; then I thought that the next time I’ll probably just be cracking up at Bill’s (mis)adventures, especially at the self-consciously foreboding atmosphere of the mansion where the orgy takes place, and thus the whole thing will be even richer and more entertaining.

      If I have any problem with it at all, it’s that Bill and Alice’s relationship seems a little too tied to Cruise and Kidman’s offscreen one circa the late 1990s; the backstory of the characters themselves is barely established

      • The mansion hosting the orgy is Highclere Castle, aka Downton Abbey. Probably not respectably British.

        I liked EWS when I first watched it, but when I rewatched it many years later, after being in a long-term relationship for a while, it hit so much harder. Both watches pried my mind open in different ways, but I was taken aback by how different my responses were. Makes me wonder what other movies I should rewatch, having grown since I last saw them.

        • Jake Gittes

          Yeah, not yet having been in a long-term relationship I suspect I was able to enjoy and admire it from greater distance than would be possible if I’d been in one.

          • Conor Malcolm Crockford

            Oh same here. Most of the time when I watch movies about marriages and intimate relationships I have to think in terms of my parents and their relationships in order to relate or empathize.

        • clytie

          Highclere Castle was also Misselthwaite Manor in the Hallmark version of The Secret Garden, which is the best version, even if it doesn’t have beautiful cinematography by Roger Deakins like the 1993 adaption.
          https://31.media.tumblr.com/0eb06e8e4c794adfec7fbfdb4d08197c/tumblr_mychliz5CC1qa4um8o3_500.gif

      • Jake Gittes

        P.S. The cut from Bill’s “I’ll tell you everything” to Alice’s face somewhat later is perfect, but I wish Kubrick had filmed a 100% unscripted scene where he had Cruise, in character, try and describe the events of the movie to Kidman. Would have made for a great DVD extra.

        • Son of Griff

          I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that a scripted scene of this was shot, knowing that Kubrick’s laborious production process was handled so as to provide maximum options in the editing room, but the elipsis, as is, was definitely the best choice.

          • Alice’s dream was close enough to Bill at the orgy that we don’t need to see him tell her; she knows what happened because in some sense, she was there. (“You’ve always been the caretaker.”)

          • Son of Griff

            Exactly, the discussion was already shown through an alternative perspective.

      • Son of Griff

        It’s nice to watch this 18 years after all the build up to its release has receded into memory, allowing the rumors, celebrity intermingling, and director’s mortality to ease out of the narrative.In some respects, EWS felt like a movie not of its time in terms of contemporary mores of sexuality—It’s a comedy of manners built on a Freudian notion of repression that might have played in fin de siecle Vienna but not contemporary New York. Considering the casting options available, Kubrick directing a modern version in the early 70s would probably have been recognized as an instant classic.I think the movie will get better over time, as the conditions in which it was initially received fade, and the core of the film can be appreciated for what it is.

      • In his last two films, Kubrick got to a tone of acceptance that wasn’t in any of his earlier films: we live and love and kill because that’s what we do, and Private Joker and Bill Harford both learn that over the course of the films; Eyes Wide Shut could just have easily ended with “and I am not afraid.” What makes it and Fight Club work, and what makes “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” not work, is that we see and feel the journey to get there.

        • Jake Gittes

          Acceptance is exactly right and it definitely stood out to me in contrast to my last viewings of his earlier films.

      • pico

        the film asks you to buy them as a couple because they are played by an actual one

        This is the Hitchcock school of filmmaking: cast someone with a specific reputation, and you don’t have to waste a reel explaining who they are.

        • Son of Griff

          It helps when the characters are conceived of as “types” as opposed to individuals whose lives are shaped by complex psychological backstories. Kubrick was definitely going for that here, relying on the magnetism of a “hot” professional couple to begin a dissembling of their unified front. It’s very noir-ish in style in a way.

          • On the Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead commentary, Sidney Lumet related something a psychologist told him: movie stars project something that they lack, and the audience imagines that they can complete them. We can derive a principle here: offscreen couples are most successful onscreen when we see the relationship not working (here, McQueen/MacGraw in The Getaway), and the most successful onscreen pairing of an offscreen couple (Tracy/Hepburn) was one where the audience couldn’t see the relationship at all.

    • Conor Malcolm Crockford

      The Good Place Season 1 episodes up to the finale. This is in one way or another a horror sitcom, and I love how much this feels like Schur critiquing his own work (and previous sitcom characters) and trying on serious dramatic story structure in a funny context. Genius, genius twist. If there’s a more audacious sitcom on air right now I gots to know about it.

      • Snap!

      • Miller

        There is a very big metafictional critique going on that I’m not sure the show will pull off (and I’ve only seen season one) but I can respect the audacity of trying to go there.

        • Conor Malcolm Crockford

          I’ve kind of wondered if the show can sustain that but we’ll see.

          • Miller

            Schur is a big David Foster Wallace fan and the author as creator/manipulator/God concept I see poking through here is something Wallace played around with.

          • Noel Murray really dove into the metafictional aspects of Lost, and Schur has not only cited that as an influence but has consulted with Damon Lindelof about it.

          • Conor Malcolm Crockford

            The very first shot of the series is I am sure a DIRECT reference to the first shot of Lost.

          • Miller

            I haven’t seen Lost but I have seen Prometheus and under all the stupidity there is some really good dark stuff about creators and created and the fear and loathing between them, so color me intrigued.

        • Favorite take on Good Place is that it direct metaphor for sitcom, with Michael as showrunner, creating new conflicts for main cast, as everyone around them are supporting players.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            And Vicki, in season 2, wanting a bigger role and a hand in the writing! Except she’s a diva who sucks at writing.

            Honestly, that metaphor-for-sitcom seemed so obvious to me I think I’d have to hear from Schur that it’s explicitly not his intent to believe it. (Hmm, the architect and the showrunner are both named Michael, you say?)

          • Miller

            But Michael himself is merely in charge of his own “show,” he has not created the dynamic that allows for it (and I haven’t seen the second season, so maybe more is explained, but as far as I know the basic dynamic of good and bad places is essentially what was laid out on the pilot). The head of the network may have made an appearance, but there is ultimately a disparity when it comes to what feeds a sitcom (viewers) and what feeds the Places (the inevitability of death), although I would not be surprised if that is addressed.

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        Review, which has ended, and Nathan For You, which isn’t really a sitcom, are the only two I can think of recently that were similarly audacious.

    • The Ploughman

      Had trouble sleeping so I came across Spider-Man 2 and let it run. Wow, it’s been a lot of years since I’ve sat with this one. The effects are bit cartoony, though the practicals are still fun, making the sudden horror scene in the hospital a highlight still. Mostly it’s a good reminder how perfect Raimi’s sensibility was for it – taking it half-seriously, no more, no less. I’d also forgotten how good Kirsten Dunst is in this, immediately portraying enough charm to make Peter Parker’s attraction understandable while containing the strength and smarts to make it clear he needs to deserve her first. It’s not surprising she became Manic Pixie Dream Girl Prime, but her work here and since proves it was the fault of the movies for not respecting what she could bring.

      • Miller

        I was just thinking about that hospital scene the other day, so badass and horrifying. The Spider-Mans have a weird counterpoint to endless Marvel expansion, they kill off great characters without regard for sequels (this seems very much of the first wave of superhero flicks) and while that is audacious it means only one movie with Molina’s great Doc Ock.

        • The Ploughman

          Oh, since when did death stop anybody in comics?

          • Miller

            Ha, true, and his is totally reversible. But it doesn’t feel that way, there is the weight of responsibility and sadness of becoming a monster that makes his death meaningful, something harder to come back from than the standard angry “death” but no body found.

          • The Ploughman

            Yeah, it would be an extra bad move in this case, and, since the Tobey Maguire Spider-Man doesn’t exist anymore either, unlikely. Maybe that means Molina could be brought back as a “new” MCU Doc Ock?

          • Miller

            Can he be Rastafied by 10 percent? Wait a minute, a Rasta Doc Ock with murder dreads sounds amazing.

          • jroberts548

            An adaptation Hickman’s Secret Wars would let them bring in whomever they want.

            If Disney ever buys the X Men rights from Fox (which I hope never happens and also that Disney doesn’t buy Fox), Secret Wars would be the way to go. They should just go crazy with it: a year long Thors adaptation as a CBS procedural, an Aranofsky about the Beyonders, a Nolan movie about incursions on some other earth, etc.

          • DJ JD

            Dig into the original origin stories and Thor spends a lot of his time as the partially disabled Dr. Blake who may or may not know he’s the God of Thunder–what will he do when Mjolnir transforms him from a decent-not-amazing pulmonologist into a gigantic Valhallan warrior who smashed enemies with his magic hammer? Will he save lives, or smash them with a magic hammer? Spoiler alert: it might just take more than one episode for him to make up his mind!

          • jroberts548

            I would watch the fuck out of that. It starts out as a medical procedural about Dr. Blake. Then he becomes Thor and becomes a procedural with superhero elements. Then the world ends and it becomes a cop procedural. It’s not really sustainable for more than 1.5 seasons, but come on.

    • Delmars Whiskers

      Wouldn’t say I watched it, but I stumbled across an episode of Walker: Texas Ranger that dealt with, as TV shows always phrased it, the Irish “troubles”. IRA terrorists, sympathetic barmaids, fiddles and tin whistles, hilariously bad Oirish accents–it’s all there, so gloriously stupid and straight-faced that it was almost admirable.

      • Miller

        Oh shit, I need to find this. Why, pray tell, were these caricatures in Texas?

        • Delmars Whiskers

          I wish I knew. It was already going when I stumbled across it, but then again, our hero has tussled with bears, gone on Native American vision quests and had old timey Western adventures, so “Irish terrorists in Texas” is actually pretty high on the Walker Credibility Scale.

          • pico

            The only “you’d think you wouldn’t find a community of European immigrants like this in Texas but in fact there are” I know of are the Czech villages around the state, but they’re not exactly as stereotypically picturesque? Like, they’d have a beer with you but let the air out of your tires.

      • pico

        Literally the only thing I know about Walker: Texas Ranger is from the AVClub interview with Lou Perryman and Sonny Carl Davis, and what Perryman has to say about Norris in that show is amazing and completely unprintable here.

        • That’s fantastic.

        • Jake Gittes

          “You rollin’ tape on this?” Brilliant. Wow at that entire interview, I’ve never heard of Eagle Pennell before and now I’m fascinated.

        • “Currently, I’m hurting over that sheriff role I didn’t get in No Country For Old Men.” Wow. We’re not gonna see interviews like this (or Tasha’s with Dave Sim) in the AVC anymore.

          • pico

            On my short list of best interviews they ever did. As was Rabin’s “Random Roles” with Bronson Pinchot, believe it or not. Celebrities who decide life is too short and they’re through with pretending to care? Interview gold.

            Yeah, nothing like this on the new AVC anymore, but frankly hard to find interviews like this anywhere anymore.

          • Man, that last sentence is everything. You and I are from the time when the AVC was something special in the culture. It’s still there, but it’s literally interchangeable with dozens of other sites. In fact, now it’s designed for that.

          • Miller

            No offense to Pinchot, but Teri Garr has even fewer fucks to give in her RR: https://film.avclub.com/teri-garr-1798214431

          • pico

            Yessssss that Garr interview is legendary. This is maybe the best exchange in the history of the site:

            AVC: In your autobiography—

            TG: So you did read it.

            AVC: I read all the excerpts I could get my hands on without paying for it.

            TG: God bless you.

            The Pinchot one is the one I quote most often, though. “You want some ice cream, in case there are no gay people there?” Ah-mazing.

            Incidentally: they were both in After Hours, so maybe that’s the magic charm.

        • Delmars Whiskers

          I suspect many Texas-based actors harbored similar feelings. On one hand, it was work, on the other hand, you had to deal with that pussy Chuck Norris.

          • pico

            Not so fun footnote: Perryman was murdered (by axe) a year after this interview.

          • Rosy Fingers

            Well, that seems about right.

        • Miller

          Oh man, I remember that interview! An utter classic, very much in the old school “termerity of the cockroach” vein.

      • Irish people also use phrase “troubles,” so that completely legit. Me sure rest of Walker‘s portrayal was equally accurate and sensitive.

        • Delmars Whiskers

          It was marked with the authenticity you’d expect from a show that, at it’s absolute best, plays like somebody reworked a spec script for Hunter.

      • Also, me would be remiss if me not mention best/most insane Walker moment of all time:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zo1kNGGEle0

        • You know phrase “but it make sense in context!”? Me think this definitive example of thing that make no sense in any context.

          • Delmars Whiskers

            Oh, it’s even worse in context. This is the episode where Walker takes li’l Haley Joel to visit his Native American buddy, which leads to Billy Jack-style spiritual visions.

          • The Ploughman

            I think if somebody had told me one of the actors in that clip would be nominated for an Oscar within five years, I probably would have guessed right.

        • The Ploughman

          The Walker Texas Ranger Lever was one of the all-time great recurring Conan gags.

    • Miller

      Always Sunny, The Gang Runs For Office — very much needed after 12 hours of election day.
      “Who am I suppose to vote for? Am I suppose to vote for th- the Democrat who’s going to blast me in the ass, or the Republican who’s blasting my ass?”
      “You see politics is all just one big ass blast.”
      Forgot how abrupt the ending to this is, though.

      And The Gang Goes Jihad — a self-aware Gang that realizes how bad their tape is! Frank still on the outside! They’re so … innocent. And the “Jew” discussion is great, while he is a moron Charlie does seem to have the best take on the nomenclature.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        “Taxes, they’ll be lower – son.”

        • Miller

          Charlie proudly mouthing along “so do” — *chef air kiss*

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            “Thank you. Thaaaaaaank you.

    • The Narrator

      RoboCop: Yeah, this movie fucking owns, end of capsule.

    • clytie

      The Monday and Tuesday episodes General Hospital. “A Tale of Two Jasons” heats up. One of his exes believes that one is the real Jason. The other ex believes that the other is.

      Valentin, my favorite character and former Russian spy, is teaming up with his former partner to take on another former partner who’s now trafficking opioids. He once fell in love with his first partner and slept with her twin sister thinking it was her (don’t you just hate it when that happens?) and was hurt when he was rejected by her. This caused him to turn evil.

      He agreed to help her, then gave a speech about how he may be a spy, thief, terrorist and murder, but he’s not a drug dealer, dammit!

      I love soaps sooooo much!
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOG5sDItBNo

    • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

      I was rather unwell yesterday– not an illness, I don’t think, so much as the product of an extreme lifestyle– so I did my best to slowly churn my way through all the television I’d missed in the last week…

      Fresh off the Boat, “Four Funerals and a Wedding.” I don’t really have much to say about this one. It was fine. Best stuff was Honey’s reaction to Princess Diana.

      The Mayor, “The Strike.” I still feel like they need to turn up the comedy on this one 10-15%.

      Curb Your Enthusiasm, “The Accidental Text on Purpose.” A lot of fun, and with some good guest performances (Ed Begley Jr., Andrea Savage, June Diane Raphael, Elizabeth Perkins). Best moment might have been Funkhouser losing his shit over the water at the end. (Oh, and Jeff’s expression after Susie says, “See? You’re the only man here who can hold onto a woman.”) And honestly, I agreed with Larry about quite a few things this time around. (Seriously, get a water filter!)

      Bob’s Burgers, “Sit Me Baby One More Time.” Whatever, Tammy IS a total bully. And it’s always hilarious to see Teddy overreact at the thought of getting caught eating a burger that isn’t Bob’s.

      The Last Man on Earth, “La Abuela”. A couple of good character moments about fear of loss aside, this episode is a good example of why my interest in the show is dwindling. About half the episode is taken up with a flashback to the pre-virus days and the cartel boss (the titular grandmother) who used to live in the house in Zihuatanejo where the gang has taken up residence. Which raises the question: Why? It’s all to foreshadow some explosives left behind in the house, but… what is it about this story that needs the post-apocalyptic setting? Nothing, and that’s my greatest frustration with this show: They’ve squandered so many of their chances to use their setting in unique ways, settling for plots about Tandy being irritating as hell or jumping away from the gang altogether to set up new twists and backstories. Even the use of the Chinese Farmer parable, one of my favorites, can’t buoy my increasing sense that this show is never going to fulfill its promise.

      Ghosted, “The Machine.” I think this one is getting better and better– the writers are really giving Robinson and Scott a chance to just let loose and do their thing, but also developing the other characters nicely. Good guest spots in this episode too, particularly Sam “Dr. Schweiber” MacMurray and Mo “Joan Callamezzo” Collins.

      Unfortunately, this means that the shows I write about I haven’t actually seen yet. You’ll have to wait one more day for my Vice Principals review.

      • Gotta say, Vice Principals this week set the bar higher than ever for itself and cleared it easily. The Goggins has a moment that belongs on his all-time acting reel, next to “Franny Abby” and the cigarette pack.

      • The Ploughman

        Product of an extreme lifestyle? Like a snowboarding injury?

        • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

          Not quite that Poochie-esque. I went on a serious four-day bender involving much lack of sleep from Wednesday – Sunday, due to Astros World Series win and my cousin’s wedding. Then on Sunday I had to drive back a U-Haul with some furniture in it on 3 hours of sleep. On Monday I went to play basketball, as I often do, but ended up playing for much longer than expected. Apparently I was not ready for that; I spent yesterday in a great deal of pain and unable to even so much as keep food down. I think I actually pushed my body so hard it was ready to give up and quit.

          • Miller

            Welcome to the stage of your physical decline where revulsion — the hangover, the bad feeling, the exhaustion — gives way to rejection, the body no longer bearing the excesses foisted upon it by the mind with a weary stolidity but shutting down in protest! It is a fun time.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            I think I’ve officially crossed the line from “I need to exercise to keep my body well given my lifestyle” to “I need to stop drinking so that I am capable of exercise the rest of the time.”

          • Miller

            One of the best things I read last year was in George V. Higgins’ The Digger’s Game (an excellent book overall) where the main character goes on a bender in Vegas and has to live (or, as it appears to him in the moment, die) with the consequences the next day. Brutally funny and waaaaay too identifiable. But let’s not throw the booze out with the backwash just yet!

  • I keep a list of the best films I see for the first time each year, and Volver has sat at the very top of this year’s list since I saw it in March. An absolutely wonderful film that I’m looking forward to returning to once I’ve explored some more Almodovar.

  • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

    oo always nice to add a noir film to my unending watchlist.

  • I have to make a decision. Do I really want to keep Netflix? They keep destroying their streaming back catalog in favor of not-that-great new films and tv series, and, for a similar amount of money, I could jump over to Hulu or Amazon Prime (Filmstruck + Criterion is also good, but so limited in its selection). I don’t really want to keep paying for the Adam Sandler train to keep rolling especially since even FX is jumping to Hulu.

    • I, too, and getting tired of Netflix. There’s enough streaming for TV for me to keep it for now, but I rarely watch movies on it. I considered going back to Netflix’s mail service, but I don’t want to give them any more money to make crappy movies while cutting the classics. At some point, I might just drop Netflix and pirate everything.

      Filmstruck I like, though I don’t use it enough. I have Amazon Prime through work. And then there’s my library’s DVD selection.

      • I’ve heard even Amazon doesn’t give Amazon Prime as a perk. What do you do where you get it as part of your work?

        • I’m an admin assistant. They want stuff from Amazon time to time asap, so I asked about Prime. They said whatever gets it here soonest. It’s not a perk or special deal – I just created a regular account with my work email address. I don’t even know if they remember that we have it.

          • The ol’ WE NEED IT NOW!!!

            So now you get free video. Awesome.

          • The shipping, too – I have my personal card saved to the account as a secondary for when I want to order something.

          • The Ploughman

            Make sure to take advantage of the music service also. I just recently discovered it and it’s a treasure trove of comedy albums and pretty much every album I owned in high school.

    • The Ploughman

      I can only speak on Amazon. The pros: Amazon Studios Films, and they renewed their exclusive agreement with A24. Other than those, the selection of movie ebbs and flows quite a bit. Where they really don’t have an answer to Netflix is comedy series. I’m a fan of Catastrophe, which can all be watched in a couple evenings, and Transparent has its moments but nothing really laugh-out-loud funny.

      • With old Futurama and FX (including Its Always Sunny) jumping ship to Hulu, the pickings on Netflix for decent comedy is going to be getting slim fairly soon.

        • The Ploughman

          Good to know.

        • Miller

          WHAT. I was literally thinking last night as I watched my Netflixed Sunnys about how pissed I would be if they left. When is this going down?

        • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

          30 Rock jumped, too.

    • Conor Malcolm Crockford

      I like Netflix for Bojack Horseman and a few other things so I might just use my sister’s password for Hulu and watch all the Always Sunny I like.

    • Prime has a surprising amount of interesting cult film stuff (in the UK at least) but it’s so hard to actually find what’s available on the service that it renders it almost useless for me. Not that Netflix is much better in that regard.

      The new stuff is actually what’s keeping Netflix interesting for me at the moment – I’m a fan of Bojack Horseman and Stranger Things and they’ve released two of my favourite films in 2017 so far (Okja and I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore) – I’m still a big fan of disc rental services for other stuff, so I feel like Netflix has a useful niche, even if I don’t actually use it that often.

    • Son of Griff

      I’m contemplating subscribing and unsubscribing to Netflix just to catch up on what I will watch from them and spend my cash on other services that concetrate on the back catalogue stuff that I’d prefer to watch more often. I think this solution is the problem with their model.

      • There’s a feature they used to have to “pause” your account – your profile is merely deactivated – you’re not billed, but you can’t stream, either. And you reactivate it when ready. I’d do that during college to keep focused during the semester. They might still have it available, though likely buried in their menus somewhere,

        • The Ploughman

          Man, between features like that and no policing of password sharing, it’s amazing they can make this work. (Reads headline about Netflix’s $20B deficit). Oh.

        • Son of Griff

          I’ve used it, but I don’t know for how long they’d keep it suspended

          • Man with a robot arm

            We’re doing it now. Customer service said the My List is held for 10 months.

    • DJ JD

      We’re probably clipping Netflix soon, too. That would leave us with Hulu and Sling, and I’d need to be really, seriously addicted to a Netflix Original™ to need back on that horse. So far, we love Sling but we got a couple of the extras so we’re looking to cut back anyway.

    • Man with a robot arm

      We put Netflix on hold in my house. Amazon just has a deeper well of older films and foreign films. We get more dvd’s from the library than we were watching Netflix. Also, our library has Hoopla, which has out paced Netflix in our house.

      • The Ploughman

        God point. Library streaming services like Hoopla have really come into their own. Kanopy has delayed my purchasing of Film Struck for a bit (good for my wallet, not good for supporting a service that appears marvelous).

    • clytie

      I dropped it ages ago. I use someone else’s Amazon Prime, which has a better selection of films (plus, you get all the other Prime benefits), and I have to have Hulu so I don’t miss General Hospital. Netflix just wasn’t worth it for me.

      I let the person whose Prime I leech off of, use my Hulu. Saves us both money.

    • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

      If you go with Amazon you can watch over a thousand cheesy Italian knock-off films in addition to getting like shudder or something.
      Lots of channel options.
      Has filmstruck gotten better, i was under the impression that the streaming wasn’t too good.

  • The Narrator

    Mosaic is now available for download on Apple products, have at it.

  • silverwheel

    This is apropos of nothing, just mentioning that I felt like Shane Vendrell today, convinced that the librarian was flirting with me. “She waved at me after I checked out, they don’t just do that.”

    • Drunk Napoleon

      It’s just too bad that you used your “Cletus Van Damme” card.

  • Jake Gittes
      • The Narrator

        Speaking of, I’m honestly waiting for the revelation of Christopher McQuarrie being a serial killer in the next month or so.

        • Huh. Wonder if Singer told him “if I go down, I’m taking you and everyone I know with me”?

          Speaking of what we’re speaking of, McQuarrie placed a vicious joke in the background of The Way of the Gun: there’s a news report on the radio in the van. You can hear just enough to establish it’s about a lawsuit against a mining company, and you hear the phrase “director Singer was accused of forcing miners to work a shaft.” I’m no longer surprised that they’ve barely worked together since The Usual Suspects.

          • The Narrator

            Hmm, they still did two movies together long after Usual Suspects came out. Maybe that was McQuarrie being pissy about Singer not using his X-Men draft and they got over it.

    • The Narrator
    • Drunk Napoleon

      I misread that title as hyperbole for a second there.

      • The Narrator

        I mean, there was a time when Spacey might have had access to all the money in the world, and that time has definitely been cut off.

    • The Narrator

      Ridley Scott, at 79 years old, made two movies (a special effects-heavy sci-fi blockbuster and a globe-spanning period drama) in one year and will be working to almost the literal last minute on one of them. This is an absolute madman.