• Oh man, as a le Carré fan, this is gooooooooood shit.

    In this kind of espionage story, so much of the work is about advancing the agenda without attracting any attention (the whole goddamn point of the tradecraft is to not be noticed) and casting and costume design can do so much of that. Although the budget was much smaller and the direction less distinguished, the BBC miniseries of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy had an absolutely killer opening scene. It’s an ordinary moment that nevertheless distinguishes its four characters in dress, bearing, and action, and before the end of the first hour, we learn its significance: 1) these four men are running British Intelligence and 2) one of them is the Russian mole. (If you haven’t seen this version, the answer is right there: it’s the one who violates protocol.)

    https://youtu.be/pq61jstTApk

    • Conor Malcolm Crockford

      Totally unrelated but one of the great running jokes of Archer is how Sterling is a TERRIBLE spy because he’s constantly telling everybody about himself, throwing money around, trying to get a guy undercover to wingman, etc.

      • le Carré wrote an early draft where Smiley just crashes the meeting and yells “REVENGE RAMPAGE!!!!!” Really made ya think.

    • Guillermo Jiménez

      By breaking protocol you mean he neglected to close the door?

      • Yup. Literally his first act (OK, non-act) is to allow unauthorized access.

        • ZoeZ

          I feel like this should be as widely talked-about as Mr. Orange ratting out Mr. Pink for not tipping in terms of brilliance in foreshadowing.

    • I’ve tried watching this several times, and my biggest problem is that, Guinness aside, I can’t tell the stuffy British men apart.

  • thesplitsaber

    Is it just me or is goldman a dead ringer for bill nighy in this photo? https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e60141dc8010cfbec5a02700b066ab25b18443c5d01353438caf2528cef55f20.jpg

    • ZoeZ

      When I saw this movie in theaters, I honestly believed he was Bill Nighy for the entire movie until the credits rolled, so you saying this is actually kind of a relief.

      • thesplitsaber

        I know how you feel. I spent all of Bone Tomahawk going ‘man how did they find this cheap actor who looks just like richard jenkins?’

  • Conor Malcolm Crockford

    Great piece already. Smiley’s wardrobe is completely unassuming, harmless, until he’s suddenly piecing together every single aspect of your life and you just haven’t noticed what his eyes have been doing the whole time.

    • Miller

      “But of course the key to Smiley is not his suits but his glasses and his preoccupation with adjusting them seems at times to be either Smiley’s protecting himself from the outside ugliness (glasses-as-defense) or allowing himself to observe closer (glasses-as-microscope).“

      This is great stuff, I think the two are intertwined – the glasses and their large frames set off and recess Smiley’s eyes, they look like fish in an aquarium and that makes them less penetrating even as they’re given focus in the face. And that lets Smiley get away with watching.

  • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

    Mark Strong can’t be that guy’s real name, right? He can’t be that good looking and have a cool name. It has to be something like Mark Tweedlebottom.

    • Michael G

      He was born “Marco Giuseppe Salussolia” and had it changed when he was a kid.

  • Drunk Napoleon

    What did we watch?

    • Drunk Napoleon

      Lost, Season Five, Episode One, “Because You Left”
      “Your camp isn’t gone. It hasn’t been built yet.”

      “You know, maybe if you ate more comfort food, you wouldn’t have to go around shooting people.”

      The opening sequence is, to my memory, the last parody of the season two opener. I recall being outraged by Dan showing up at the end, because I knew the show well enough to know that we wouldn’t get an explanation for a long time; eighteen-year-old me was somewhat of an idiot, considering they basically explain it in this, though of course actually getting to that point would take a while (this is the sort of thing I mean when I say Lost ruined my taste for slow builds). It’s also the one and only flash of any kind all episode; the Oceanic Six have gone from a flashforward to a main drama, and we’re cutting between them, the time travellers, and Locke (of course he’d be all on his own). Usually when I say something is “changing gears”, I mean changing direction; this genuinely feels the same as changing gears on a car, in that we’ve built up momentum, and now we switch gears and start going impossibly fast.

      I was wrong – there are still survivors on the island! Just imagine being, like Dwayne the accountant, caught up in this ridiculousness.
      Lindelof once said he wrote the show for both the mythology nerds and “[his] mom, who wanted to see Sawyer with his shirt off”; I thought about that all episode because not only does James walks around without a shirt on, he has a legitimate reason not to (having just swam through the ocean before losing all his stuff), and there’s even a scene calling attention to it (though not in a meta way). I also find myself thinking of my privileged position as a mythology nerd who wants to see Sawyer with his shirt off; Lost has the soapy dramatic structure as scaffolding, but like all literature it’s better for you to buy into as many ideas as possible.

      Ethan shows up! The show uses iconic Lost moments as a centre of gravity for both the audience and characters to orient themselves. This has the minor emotional effect of reminding us how far we’ve come, and how much we’ve done.

      Finally, the episode ends with the reveal that the rules don’t apply to Desmond, and we have a genuine case of an exception proving the rule, in the archaic sense of ‘improving’, or ‘the exception that articulates why the rule exists in the first place’. Desmond’s specialness is a flagrant cheat that lets them push the story forward, but it’s a cheat based in what we already know (that Desmond has time powers), and it’s a cheat that only Desmond is allowed to get away with, while, say, Jack can’t. The story’s stakes and conflict are still meaningfully the same as before.

      Ownage: James slaps Dan. Sayid fucking wipes out a bunch of hitmen.

      Also, I’m making a formal request for film recs. Both your absolute favourite films – I have Full Metal Jacket and 20th Century Women on my to-watch list – and things you think I’d genuinely get a kick out of.

      • Jake Gittes

        Only Angels Have Wings
        Gun Crazy
        Letter Never Sent
        Harakiri (1962)
        Chinatown
        To Live and Die in L.A.
        Memories of Murder

        All these can be pretty safely put in both columns I think.

      • ZoeZ

        These are not obscure, so you’ve possibly already seen all of them, but:

        Boogie Nights
        Lawrence of Arabia
        Dog Day Afternoon
        The Killing
        Ace in the Hole
        A Night to Remember
        Upstream Color
        (totally different from the rest of these, but an interesting cinematic/literary contrast, and still something I really like)
        Weekend
        Body Heat

        All favorites of mine–if I can count Boogie Nights given that I watched it, like, last week–and all things I think you would like.

        • The Ploughman

          So many great recommendations here. Wanted to highlight Dog Day Afternoon as essential viewing. It’s unbelievable how good it is, even with its influence being thinned out over so many other movies.

      • Babalugats

        For movies I love here’s the whole unwieldy list. https://letterboxd.com/babalugats/tag/master-list/lists/

        For specific recommendations, I would first watch everything @JakeGittes:disqus mentioned, and then check out some Sam Fuller movies. They’re fast paced genre films with a distinct morality to them, and a lot of social insight that grows organically from the story. Underworld USA is my favorite. Also, anything with Humphrey Bogart.

      • I’m terrible at recommendations unless I’ve got very specific parameters to work with, but…

        City of God
        In a Lonely Place
        Night and the City
        The Right Stuff
        Point Blank
        Le Trou

        Also a massive second to Harakiri.

        Apologies if you watched any of these three days ago, talked about them at length and I already forgot.

      • Here’s my personal Top 10:

        2001: A Space Odyssey
        Dr. Strangelove
        Taxi Driver
        Seven Samurai
        Play Time
        Apocalypse Now
        The Third Man
        8 1/2
        Monty Python’s Life of Brian
        The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara

        Not a super interesting list – most are Film 101 – but I like them.

        • More off-the-path films I really like:

          Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
          American Splendor
          Solaris
          The Proposition
          Short Term 12
          Dead Man
          Battle of Algiers
          Waking Life
          Lone Star

          Hope this isn’t too much.

      • Miller

        REPO MAN REPO MAN REPO MAN REPO MAN

        Ahem. And because you were going through some Peckinpah recently (CROSS OF IRON CROSS OF IRON), some great grungy 70s manliness and its consequences: The Longest Yard, Charley Varrick and of course The Friends Of Eddie Coyle.

        EDIT: And apropos of nothing except it’s a favorite that I was thinking about the other day, The Triplets Of Belleville.

        • Son of Griff

          Well, you just took my list. I’d add, however, TWO LANE BLACKTOP, COCKFIGHTER, VANISHING POINT, HICKEY AND BOGGS, GONE IN 60 SECONDS, and PRIME CUT.

          • Miller

            I don’t know how we can get Napoleon to watch Prime Cut oh wait yes I do: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51EBKBGF14L._SY445_.jpg

          • John Bruni

            COCKFIGHTER is one of my top picks for film that has the most unbelievable scenes strung together. And I’d add to the list 92 IN THE SHADE (more Oates!) and CALIFORNIA SPLIT.

          • Son of Griff

            Love CALIFORNIA SPLIT, even though it reminds me too much of people I was hanging out with in the 90s. 92 IN THE SHADE is something I need to get on to, as I really am intrigued by Thomas McGuane.

            In light of the rise of what is now called “toxic masculinity” in American political culture, the films of the seventies seem very relevant again.

          • Miller

            I still need to see Cockfighter but I’ve read the source novel and I don’t think anyone had a better handle on toxic masculinity than Charles Willeford – The Shark-Infested Custard was written in the 70s, published in the 80s and is entirely contemporary today.

          • Son of Griff

            The Shark Infested Custard is pretty much Very Bad Things as 70s neo-noir. Cockfighter is among the most deranged books I’ve ever read, where rationality reaches an apotheosis with a psychotic system of honor.

      • Going on the things-you-might-not-have-seen-and-no-one-else-mentioned-it-yet principle:

        Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control
        Titus
        Prince of the City
        Sneakers
        Manhunter
        (dir. Michael Mann)
        Swimming to Cambodia
        The Passion of Joan of Arc
        (watch it silent, then listen to Richard Einhorn’s music, then watch it with the music) The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes
        Matewan
        Bull Durham

        • Conor Malcolm Crockford

          Titus is so great and I feel like it gets undeservedly forgotten. One of my alltime Shakespeare adaptations.

          • It’s my pick for #1 on that list, with Throne of Blood coming in second. Mamet’s line “our heroes were those with vast talent and audacity, and no respect” applies to both, as does the principle of “sign on Harry Lennix or Toshiro Mifune and have them own shit.”

        • John Bruni

          Reminds me that I need to watch Prince of the City.

          • You will, as the kids say, dig–it’s sort of a Cassavetes/Arthur Miller hybrid.

        • Son of Griff

          It took almost 50 years, but with SNEAKER’S we finally got to hear Sidney Poitier say “motherfucker” on screen.

          • Two great postwar pop culture images of the black man are Sidney Poitier and John Shaft, and to see Poitier himself go full Shaft was pure joy.

          • Son of Griff

            Poitier’s attempts to adapt to the hyperbolic trends of 70s black masculinity are really interesting in how they try to add a heightened level of defiance without looking “negative”. I really like BUCK AND THE PREACHER as both an example of racial revisionism in the Hollywood Western and a subtle commentary on its blacksploitation counterpart.

          • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

            And we got to see what Hill Valley looked like when it snowed.

        • Quinn the Eskimo

          Manhunter is the absolute gold standard for filmic police procedurals, and I now want to read whatever you have to write about it.

          • I’m not sure than I can do better than whoever called it “Michael Mann’s Vertigo,” but I’ll try. Among other things, it may be the most rigorous demonstration of the male gaze ever.

          • Quinn the Eskimo

            I’ve never considered Manhunter that way, but now that you suggest that, it does make a lot of sense. I always attributed that approach of dramatizing the male gaze to The Silence of the Lambs rather than Manhunter. Come to think of it, though, Hannibal has a lot of that as well…

          • The Silence of the Lambs is about the male gaze, but it’s about being on the other end of it, it’s about being the object. Manhunter puts you (at several times, quite literally) in the position of the male viewer. Of course, this is something that zillions of crappy movies have done, but Mann gonna Mann: he explores that with camerawork and uses Harris’ novel to make that integral to the action. Graham’s arc is trying to see the world as Dolarhyde sees it, and the breakthrough moment comes when he sees exactly what Dolarhyde sees, and realizes why. (I just remembered that I include a discussion of that moment at the very beginning of the first Soundtracking.)

            Hannibal is a whole ‘nother story, and one based around what we probably have to call the queer gaze. That one’s gonna have to be handled by people who know it better than me.

          • Quinn the Eskimo

            This… I might have to write something about this.

          • Babalugats

            It’s probably not the best way to catch murderers, but “this is my design” is just about the most useful tool for understanding art I’ve ever come across.

      • The Narrator

        I was jokingly going to make a list of just Soderbergh movies, but I seriously cannot recommend The Limey highly enough for you, as both an ownage delivery vehicle and a meditation on what happens to those who own.

        • Miller

          And after you’ve watched The Limey, or before (or during?) watch Point Blank.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        The Devils
        Night of the Hunter
        Breathless
        Moonlight
        Quadrophenia (film)
        Green Room
        Blue Ruin
        Fright Night
        The Holy Mountain

        • Babalugats

          I’m always cautious recommending Jodorowsky to anyone, but I’d love to hear Napolean’s thoughts on Holy Mountain.

          • I struggle to recommend Jodorowsky because of shit like this:

            “After she had hit me long enough and hard enough to tire her, I said, ‘Now it’s my turn. Roll the cameras.’ And I really… I really… I really raped her. And she screamed. Then she told me that she had been raped before. You see, for me the character is frigid until El Topo rapes her. And she has an orgasm. That’s why I show a stone phallus in that scene… which spouts water. She has an orgasm. She accepts male sex. And that’s what happened to Mara in reality. She really had that problem. Fantastic scene. A very, very strong scene.”

            https://www.tor.com/2017/05/02/jodorowskys-dune-didnt-get-made-for-a-reason-and-we-should-all-be-grateful/

          • Son of Griff

            Wow, and I just quaintly ignored him because of the Fellini influences.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            I have a friend who’s a big fan of The Holy Mountain, and I think I saw it with him once, but my memory of it is rather fuzzy. Probably the drugs.

      • Son of Griff

        Top 10 consisting of movies not already mentioned:

        Once Upon a Time in the West
        The Wild Bunch
        Touch of Evil
        His Girl Friday
        The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence
        The Godfather
        North by Northwest
        Sunset Boulevard
        Rebel Without a Cause
        Barry Lyndon:

        Seconded: Seven Samurai, Chinatown, Lawrence of Arabia.

        As for books, you need to check out Patrick O’Brien’s Aubrey/Maturin series. It’s late 18th Century masculinity in all of its complexity (and language) coupled with swashbucking action. Next to Ellroy, it’s the best fiction I’ve encountered post college.

        • Miller

          Oh god huge second on Aubrey/Maturin (and of course the Master and Commander movie). Bonus – read it thinking of Aubrey as Drama and Maturin as Literary and watch how they trade off.

          • Son of Griff

            Great observation!!

      • Quinn the Eskimo

        Did someone say film recs? Because I have a few:

        Bad Day at Black Rock
        Le Cercle Rouge
        Night and the City
        Hellzapoppin’
        The Great Silence
        Criss Cross
        Chungking Express/Fallen Angels

        • Jake Gittes

          Hellzapoppin’ is something else. I’m still not 100% sure if it’s an actual movie or if I just dreamed it.

          • Quinn the Eskimo

            I don’t think I trust my imagination to come up with something as wild as that movie. I rented a copy of it from Cinefile Video in LA (who are friggin’ amazing, by the way) and watched it over Thanksgiving break, and my lungs nearly imploded from laughter during the first scene alone.

          • Man with a robot arm

            It’s pretty amazing. There are at least three ZAZ and two Mel Brooks films along with some Joe Dante in the first 15 minutes alone.

          • Quinn the Eskimo

            And don’t forget the MST3K part!

      • pico

        Lots of good old canonical stuff suggested so far, so these are probably my 5 favorite films released during my lifetime (alphabetically):

        Barton Fink
        Fast, Cheap & Out of Control
        Irma Vep
        The Master
        Tropical Malady (my favorite film. this one I’m sure about)

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        I’m not much of a film buff– you’ve probably seen all the great ones I could recommend, or else someone beat me to them (Dr. Strangelove, Chinatown, Boogie Nights)– but many of my favorite, most compulsively rewatchable films are seemingly-stupid comedies done very smart. A sample would include:

        Wayne’s World
        Billy Madison
        Office Space
        10 Things I Hate About You
        Super Troopers
        MacGruber

      • Rosy Fingers

        Rather than my favourite films, necessarily, I’m going to recommend a selection of really worthwhile Australian films (because I’m pretty sure you’re a fair bit younger than me and may have missed some of these):

        Dogs in Space (1987)
        Malcolm (1986)
        Three Dollars (2005)
        Idiot Box (1996)
        Walkabout (1971)
        Night Cries: A Rural Tragedy (1990 – short film)
        Samson & Delilah (2009)
        Storm Boy (1977)
        The Year My Voice Broke (1987)

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        Hmm, I’m trying to think of other movies I enjoy that I don’t think get enough exposure, but it’s mostly stuff like a well-known director’s early efforts (Flirting With Disaster, Bottle Rocket). I would recommend Hands on a Hard Body, which ends up being really funny in one of those ways that only happens “in real life and great fiction.” (I’m now also reminded that I never saw American Movie, which rates on my to-see list for similar reasons.)

        I would certainly recommend The Room, although it’s best seen with a group of people and some understanding of what you’re in for (like the AV Club’s guide). But I find it genuinely fascinating, even/especially on repeated viewing.

    • The Wire, Season 2, episodes 1 and 2 – well, I lasted a whole day before returning to Baltimore. From my previous viewing (which was actually at the end of 2010, because I got a “Facebook Memory” about it the other day), I remember being slightly baffled and disappointed by the start of this season but growing to love it by the end (my hazy memories tell me it was my second favourite season, after 4, but we’ll see).

      This time around, I still found these first two episodes quite alienating – there are a whole load of new characters, but also a need to check in on most of the major players from the first, which makes everything feel a bit scattered and overwhelming. It also means that most of the new characters don’t really make an impression yet (apart from Ziggy, who gets his dick out and endears himself to all). Still full of great stuff though, and I’m sure I’ll warm to it (and Frank Sobotka, who I remember becoming one of the most interesting characters on the show), just like I did last time.

      Highlights: Everyone taking the piss out of McNulty’s new job, McNulty doing extra work just to dump cases on Rawls (but the cases landing on Bunk and Lester), Bodie being confused by different radio stations on his first real trip out of Baltimore, Avon already being the King Of Prison, the new detail being set up entirely because of a dispute over stained glass windows.

      Lowlights: The stuff with The Greek and his Russian henchman feels a bit clichéd to me, like something out of a cheap action b-movie rather than the high Wire standard set by the first season. I can’t remember if those characters get a chance to grow over time or not.

      • ZoeZ

        The second season was a slow build for me, but it does eventually turn into one of my favorites, and its self-contained nature–at least on the docks–gives it a great tragic structure.

        I never really thought the Greek and his associates rose above the cliche–there’s something fundamentally shrugged off about them; Simon’s writing about America and they’re not, you know, American, so it feels like there’s a limit to how much he cares, which is a definite fault–but McNulty’s careful, painstaking charting of the tides in order to fuck over Rawls is one of the greatest things on television, especially since Rawls, at least initially, has to just give him points for the sheer inventiveness of it.

        • There are some more great parallels between storylines in these episodes too – McNulty’s policework being driven by a grudge, just as Valchek’s investigation into Sobotka is, and Bunk’s evidence going missing in a very similar way to Ziggy losing the container.

          I barely remembered The Greek and co. It’s generally a bad sign when characters turn up and don’t spark anything in my memory (see also Sydnor in the first season, cursed to be competent but not particularly interesting).

          • ZoeZ

            Season five Sydnor inheriting the McNulty-ness of McNulty is one of the least-earned moments on the show.

          • I barely remember anything about season five – is that where the absurd McNulty serial killer stuff kicks in?

            Still looking forward to revisiting it, though. But not as much as I’m looking forward to season four and all those lovely, tragic kids. And Cutty!

          • ZoeZ

            It is! I’m more forgiving of the serial killer stuff than the hamfisted newspaper plotline with all the mustache-twirling THE NOTEBOOK WAS BLANK ALL ALONG nonsense; the emotional beats still tend to land even when I’m critical, though.

          • I remember thinking the McNulty stuff was quite fun, but it definitely feels like it’s stretching the world of the series a bit too far. I’ve basically forgotten the entire newspaper plot, I think, although it may flood back to me when I hear the right version of the theme song.

          • It’s the worst part of the series my a wide margin because, instead of a critical eye, Simon really feels like he has a personal grudge (which he did). So instead of a systematic failure, the papers are failing because of This Fucking Guy.

          • Miller

            Bingo. And he actually does get at systemic problems and killer details (the fire doll is a great zinger) at the paper but there’s too much personal baggage that affects character development.

          • Son of Griff

            It’s Marx’s dictum of history repeating itself as farce.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            I actually like the first spoiler; I’ve said it before (I believe on this very website!) but it has been set up for four seasons in a way that such a decision is both plausible and in character for McNulty. (I think it also helps to remember that The Wire is not a documentary.)

        • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

          I think Simon has said something to the effect that the Greek represents raw, unfettered, unencumbered capitalism, and we really see that as the series goes on. I’m thinking in particular of season 2 when his response to Frank’s qualms about smuggling is simply to offer him more money, and in season 5 when he and Vondas conclude Marlo “is not Joe,” but decide not to get involved because Marlo is going to make his move one way or the other, and all they really need is someone who keeps buying the drugs.

    • ZoeZ

      Episodes five and six of Mindhunter: The Hunter of Minds. (No, I’m not going to stop calling it that, it makes me too happy.) Torv finally gets some real material as she has to make a choice between her work and her personal life; her choice can be predicted by both her haircut and her whole demeanor. I found myself arguing with Holden at one point about his glumness about whether or not they can effectively communicate their findings to local cops and prosecutors–“You did communicate them, Holden, he just needed something simpler and more workable!” Bill Tench remains a delight.

    • Babalugats

      Stranger Things 2 – Was this season way slower than the first, or is this just what tv is going to feel like post-Shield? I think part of the issue is that season one had a much stronger hook. Who is Eleven, who’s after her, and where is Will? It also suffers from a problem that plagues every serialized drama that isn’t The Shield, in that all of the characters that served a specific narrative function in the first season are still around, and the show has to find something for them to do. Instead of one big story, we have 15 little ones. (Whatever monster they have planned for season three, I hope it has an appetite, because this cast is starting to get unwieldy.) I find myself questioning some of the priorities here. Why are you telling me about this middle school love triangle when we could be following those super powered punk anarchists? Why would you take your best character and lock her in a box for half the season?

      That said I still enjoyed the show, and it’s still very good at the things it does well.

      This season has what I like to call a superman plot- where Superman is off dicking around in space and Jimmy Olsen and Lois Lane are getting into a bunch of trouble, and most of the plot is just waiting for Superman to show up and fix everything. Superman plots aren’t the most dramatically satisfying, but they work if you have interesting characters and an interesting setting, and this show excels at both.

      Will has become one of my favorite character types, the guy that knows juuuust a little bit more than everybody else, and is totally apocalyptic about it. (Best example of this character; Blair from The Thing). I don’t know if it’s the casting or the performance, but that little guy just oozes terror. Everyone else is brushing off all this trama, and Will just isn’t. He’s in the middle of town, shaking, eyes bugging out of his head, talking about how everybody’s going to die. I hope they keep using him as the damsel.

      Eleven is such a great character. She’s one of those characters that can’t help but immediately drive the story forward. “So we’re going to set up this threat, and it’s going to loom over the characters for three or four episodes until it finally pushes them to- wait, no, Eleven just killed the guy. That’s it, we’re sending you to Philadelphia.” Eleven goes through three seasons of television while the rest of cast gets trapped in a series of smaller and smaller sheds.

      I remain more convinced than ever that Winona Ryder should be playing the sardonic sheriff, and David Harbour should be the frazzled single parent.

      • Miller

        Confession: I’m not a huge fan of Ryder or her character. She just seems underwritten and one-note and having to do the same god damn shit this season didn’t help. Will is excellent but shit, give the poor kid something to do and give that wiener Mike a disease instead of his current affliction of Sullen Teenery.

        • Babalugats

          Mike is what happens when you turn a bland audience insert protagonist into a supporting character. Now that the older generations know what is going on, the kids are a lot more extraneous to the plot, and I felt you could have almost cut them out entirely (except for Will and Eleven).

          I thought Ryder’s character improved a lot this year, but is still a waste of her talents. Let her be cool, let her be funny. She’s a genuine 80s icon, and the show isn’t doing anything with that.

          • Miller

            “Let her be cool, let her be funny” – yes! She just seems to be frazzled, which, I understand, but if you’re going to bloat things already give her some Dustin/Steve stuff. I was also very disappointed in how Mike and Nancy’s mom went from an interesting minor character to a joke this season (although their dad as a constant clueless buffoon is a joke I greatly enjoy).

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            As much as as I didn’t care for Billy, if he doesn’t have an affair with Mrs. Wheeler in season 3 I’ll be very disappointed.

          • Babalugats

            I thought he was supposed to be gay, but I’m not always great at picking up on these things

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            You’re not the only one. They left it deliberately ambiguous, although I chalked it up to the way the 80s had glam-femme as a major trend in male fashion. That scene between the two of them in the finale, anyway, suggested something more there.

      • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

        I agree with everything you said except for Will. I hope they leave that poor kid alone in season 3. He’s been through enough.

        • Babalugats

          Once you’ve come this far you might as well go all the way. I hope they go all Cronenbergy with him.

          • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

            You hope he turns into a fly and then his head explodes? That’s ice cold, man.

          • Babalugats

            That kid’s got Goldblum in his veins! Are we doing an 80s pastiche or not?

          • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

            Why can’t we make it a nice 80s pastiche? Have him fly across the moon on his bicycle with his little alien friend, or maybe he wishes he was big and turns into Tom Hanks and then totally has sex with Elizabeth Perkins.

          • Miller

            I would hope Will at least reaches 18 before he’s in a naked knife fight.

          • I hope that, for his eighteenth birthday, he receives a sharp knife and a suspicious absence of clothing.

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        I think this season was pretty slow for about the first third of its runtime, but then it really got going. That said, I’m more interested in the characters than the mystery, so a slow-moving mystery isn’t a big deal to me.

        Also, Eleven is not just a great character but one of the best performances on television. I remember reading that a critic or writer somewhere (maybe William Goldman?) saw Leonardo DiCaprio in What’s Eating Gilbert Grape? and was so stunned by his talent he wrote “Please, God, don’t let anything happen to him.” That’s pretty much how I feel about Millie Bobby Brown.

        You can read more Stranger Things thoughts in the relevant section of my end-of-year TV writeup. (Don’t worry, it’s right there at the top.)

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        But, yes, most TV feels like this after The Shield. (The latter is a lot like Fight Club that way– I mean the actual thing, as described in the movie Fight Club: “After fighting, everything else in your life got the volume turned down.”)

    • Glorbes

      Bob’s Burgers, in which the kids are fired from the restaurant and wind up working for some filthy middle aged hippies on their pot farm. I let my oldest kid watch it. I regret nothing.

      Also, my wife and I watched the first episode of season 2 of Dirk Gently. Not from any great desire to actually watch Dirk Gently, but it was…there…and we both had middling interest in it as something to zone out to. I forgot everything from the first season, so I was mildly confused as to what the hell was happening.

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        with Nick Offerman and Megan Mullally as the hippie pot farmers!

    • Miller

      School of Rock — rock as democracy (demrockracy?) or what David Foster Wallace called a Democratic Spirit. I had less trouble with Sarah Silverman’s evil nag because she plays it to the hilt as such and because the movie is so generous otherwise. Everyone is in the band and the band is not, as Dewey has to learn, a dictatorship but a collaboration of disparate parts proving their essential worth in pursuit of a shared goal and failing with honor (the encore over the prize is a better tribute to Bad News Bears’ beer over trophy than Linklater’s actual BNB remake). And because this sounds way too serious, the movie also embraces the ridiculousness of rock while never undermining it – ridiculousness can be bad or empty (Black’s wankery at the beginning, the dudebro posturing of No Vacancy) but also sublime, like the rightly-heralded slow pull back on Black singing The Legend Of The Rent or the close-up of national treasure Joan Cusack (who is absolutely wonderful in this) getting lost in “Edge Of Seventeen.” The soundtrack is of course superb but the longest we hear a song until the end is a montage set to the Ramones’ Bonzo Goes To Bitburg, a song that is pretty ridiculous itself but unwaveringly so, aching and rocking and open and free. God damn I love this movie.

      • I love that this became a Broadway musical. It works so well! Also:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=refCJcJJZso

        • Miller

          *sees the adorable backup singers as adults, dissolves into withered bone and ash a la Walter Donovan in Last Crusade*

      • John Bruni

        I always thought Bonzo Goes to Bitburg was one of their most serious songs: about Reagan visiting the graves of members of the SS, another horrific example of “both sides are really okay” political discourse.

        • Miller

          Oh, it is about that, but absent a pretty throrough grounding in the history of the event they’re referring to and Reagan’s movie career it’s relatively hard to parse in a lot of ways – it’s pretty layered for a Ramones song, which usually takes a pretty universal concept and expresses it simply. That happens here too, “My brain is hanging upside down” is a quintessential Ramones lyric, but this risks weirdness and pretension in a way a lot of their songs don’t (and supposedly super-conservative Johnny HATED it). And yet it’s also one of their poppiest songs! I love it, in case that wasn’t clear.

          • John Bruni

            Yeah I think it’s one of their best songs. Johnny is a real asshole: he stole Joey’s girlfriend, which inspired “The KKK Took My Baby Away.”

          • Miller

            Another great song! And the obliqueness and personal reference in the metaphor is entirely subsumed by its literal delivery, which is more in line with classic Ramones simplicity.

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        As great and joyous as the movie is, especially Black and the kids, one of my favorite moments is the No Vacancy douchebag hitting on Joan Cusack.

        *mumbles* “So hot…”
        “I’m sorry? Are you warm?”

    • PCguy

      LA CURÉE (1966)
      A vanity project for Roger Vadim to film Jane Fonda, his then wife, in various states of undress. It takes place almost entirely in the 60’s baroque/classical mansion of a Parisian bureaucrat where Fonda’s character sleeps with her husbands’ son in various rooms. Painfully sexist and ugly in its’ opulence this is a film that demands to be forgotten.

      GREAT EXPECTATIONS (1998)
      ”THIS IS SO BAAAD, bad in a way that implies the source material is shitty. fuck charles dickens & male written lesson plans.” – katieblashford letterboxd.com

      This film brought me to the uncomfortable realization that a movie can actually detract from ones enjoyment of a beloved novel. The slice taken out of the book portrays all of the characters as petty and ugly. Even poor old Joe is depicted as an oafish loser. Sad to see such a great novel reduced to a one note movie about Gwenyth Paltrow being a bitch.

      A TALE OF TWO COREYS (2018)
      Here’s a fine film about two lovable urchins are suddenly thrust into wealth and prominence. The script has a strong pro-Feldman bias that makes Haim seem like a bad influence on the Coreys but that may have actually been the case and we can’t get his perspective anymore. My only complaint is that the film could have been a lot longer. I’d like it to cover Feldman’s directorial debut in the trash classic BUSTED. A Zucker brothers ripoff about cops running a brothel out of a police station, the film is notable in Coreyography for Haim’s firing after only a couple days on set. We also get far too little of Feldman’s talents in music and dance. I would have recreated his classic 1992 performance of “What’s Up with the Youth”. I’d put the Youtube link the the original performance here but it’s probably not something you should be caught watching at work.

    • The Ploughman

      Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri – Martin McDonagh’s play The Cripple of Inishman is a frequently hilarious study in cruelty. It takes place in a small town (in Ireland), has a drunken elderly mother, a distaste for priests, past tragedies seeping into the present and a key moment of coughing up blood. I point this out not to say Three Billboards is recycled material – it’s wildly unpredictable – but by way of explaining why I wasn’t too concerned with the Ebbing, Missouri matching the real Missouri. In their clever dialog, these are McDonagh characters first, Midwesterners second.

      The large lush hill by Frances McDormand’s house indicates we’re in super-south Missouri, and while that place is racist as hell, McDonagh’s research still feels a couple of decades out of date. I was distracted for a while by the time displacement – the daughter’s frozen-in-time bedroom has an In Utero poster, but Rockwell’s character namechecks Google – but luckily the film takes control on its own terms and becomes splendidly compelling, tense and tragic in its back half. It’s a strange time to depict such characters with such sympathy. But the movie’s depiction of grief, and the way it makes us selfish and prone to “begit” more grief, makes it pretty timeless.

      • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

        Question: Did you think Rockwell’s character was planning on killing his mother and himself before McDormand’s character suggested they go on the road as rapist-killing avenging angels?

        • Babalugats

          I didn’t, but now that you’ve mentioned it, I can definitely see it.

        • Miller

          Definitely thought that. There is some weird stuff about suicide, with this near-miss and with the sheriff’s success that I’m not sure the movie is coherent or well-thought-out on.

          • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

            I’m glad it didn’t happen. More than one suicide a movie is too many. It’s not called Three Suicides Outside Ebbing, Missouri. Although that would be a catchy title.

          • Quinn the Eskimo

            Three Billboards, Two Suicides, One Ebbing, Missouri

          • And a partridge in a pear tree!

          • Quinn the Eskimo

            FIIIIIIIVE GOLDEN GLOOOOOBES (minus one)

        • The Ploughman

          I did, and it made the scene intense as hell. That scene to me is the key to the film. When dealing with a grief strong enough (and I consider Willoughby to be dealing with grief as well), your options are to point the gun at yourself or find somebody else to point it at. It’s a bleak outlook for sure, and we’re used to being given an another, gentler option in the movies. But the film isn’t about those other options, just how shit gets out of hand when those are the only two choices the characters see.

          • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

            I agree. Although, I think by the end there are glimmers that the characters might be able to see other options in which to channel their feelings of anger and remorse. Another question: Wasn’t it crazy when Rockwell threw that guy out the window?

          • The Ploughman

            Yes, it was pretty crazy when Rockwell through that guy out the window. We should put on imdb trivia that the entire scene was improvised by Rockwell and see if it gets posted.

          • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

            I’m on it: “The scene in which Sam Rockwell’s character, Dixon, throws Caleb Landry Jones’ character, Red, out of the window of his office was shot in one take and totally improvised by Rockwell. Originally Rockwell was merely supposed to beat Jones with the gun and leave the office, but he got so into the scene that he threw Jones out of the window. McDonagh and the rest of the crew were stunned, but after discussing the incident with Jones, who suffered no serious injuries, it was kept in the final film. “

          • The Ploughman

            I will be the first 1 out of 1 people to find it interesting.

      • Miller

        The lack of place may work in Cripple but it is entwined with the movie’s indifference to black people except as props here. McDonagh puts a bubble around his characters.

        • The Ploughman

          That’s fair. It’s a strange time to deliver this movie (and even stranger time to give it awards). I’ve seen “tone-deaf” appear in more than one place and I don’t disagree. McDonagh seem to be trying to counterbalance setting it in such a specific place – if Ebbing were real it couldn’t be more than two hours’ drive from Ferguson – with a strange out-of-time feel. It’s an unsuccessful attempt to hide from the way racial issues are out in the open now more so than in a vaguely 90s-00s era.

          I just had the thought that, even though the movie as is hinges on McDormand’s fine performance, the movie would be more interesting with no changes except her character being played by a black actress.

          • Babalugats

            I think the movie is timely. I think the movie is about radicals and the difficulty of trying to balance radical action with empathy. You want to stop the police from torturing black people, burn all the police stations to the ground. You want to stop systemic sexual abuse, you aren’t going to do it without hurting some men that you like and admire. If you are against the way someone campaigns for a cause, then you are against that cause. You can’t predict or control the consequences, but if you’re not willing to risk that, then you’re defending the status quo. You are part of the system. But to be outside of the system means killing all the motherfuckers. It means shutting off a part of your humanity.

            I also think it’s important, at least plot wise, that Mildred is white. She gets away with a lot that I don’t think she would have if she weren’t white. One of the major themes of the film is complicity, and Mildred is complicit in the unlawful imprisonment of her black friend. She had a certain standing with the police that she exploits to her own ends, and the retribution for that is paid out to people who are just a little less secure.

          • The Ploughman

            I like and agree with everything in your first paragraph. I can see the second paragraph, but where you see a theme of complicity in the face of authority I see authorial disinterest. Mildred’s friend was in jail for a few days, which is a pretty long time in this movie, and I don’t see Mildred taking any action or deliberately choosing not to take action around that. She doesn’t burn down the jail until her billboards are burned. I think a better case can be made that the white characters don’t get up and arms about injustice until it happens to them. But that’s just a little seasoning to the theme in your first paragraph rather than a theme on its own. I’ll stop well short of saying it’s wrong to do it that way, but I don’t find myself disagreeing with the criticisms of his handling of race when he makes a movie in 2017, puts “Missouri” in the title, brings up issues of police brutality in the first ten minutes, and then largely fails to pay off that aspect of the story.

          • Babalugats

            Oh, I definitely think the movie had issues with race, but they’re more about how thinly drawn the black characters are, than anything it’s explicitly saying. And I agree that “Ebbing Missouri” could be basically any rural American town, and McDonagh doesn’t seem to have a feel for the specifics of the culture.

            I found complicity to be a central theme, though. Mildred gives that speech about everyone in a gang being complicit in the crimes of the other gang members in her confrontation with the priest, and it’s hard not to see that as an indictment of the police. “Even if you didn’t do anything. Even if you never saw anything. You’re still complicit. You put on the colors. You joined the gang.” That’s a lot more applicable to the police than the church, and we see that Willoughby is complicit in Dixon’s crimes. He knows he’s racist, and he knows he has tortured black people while in custody, and he protects him. He says that getting rid of all the racists in the police force would only leave three cops in the whole country. Which means, more or less, that to be a cop is to be a racist and to be complicit in the oppression of black people. And to support the police is to support that oppression. Mildred’s attack on the police also suggests that every man is complicit in the abuse of women. If you’re not willing to sacrifice all your civil rights, if you aren’t willing to go city to city, man to man, to find this rapist, than you are complicit in that rape. The movie doesn’t explicitly make this point about race, but I think it’s supported by the text. Mildred cares more about her crusade than she does about the well being of her friend. She burns down the police station as revenge for her billboards, but does nothing about Dixon torturing a black person. The whole town knows about that, and does nothing. To be white, and to benefit from your whiteness, is to be complicit in the crimes of whiteness. I also think there’s some insight into the way different causes are often in competition with each other. Making political gains in the south might require sacrificing abortion rights, or the rights of gay and trans people. Bill Clinton got elected by being tough on crime. Barack Obama ran against gay marriage. If the media focuses on one story (say the epidemic of sexual assault) it often means ignoring another (say the epidemic of police brutality). Which I think the movie understands instinctively, even if that’s never at the forefront of the story.

          • The Ploughman

            I think everything here is an interesting take on the events in the film, and while I don’t think anything you see is at odds with the text, I think you’re giving the movie a bit of extra credit.

            “…McDonagh doesn’t seem to have a feel for the specifics of the culture.”

            I don’t have a problem with McDonagh’s take on rural America because I don’t feel like he’s trying to say anything about rural America in particular. His lack of interest in the specific dynamics of a southern Missouri community at this time generated a lot of the criticism and it’s easy to see where that comes from. It’s a bit like setting a film near Gettysburg Pennsylvania in 1864 and saying “Yeah, there’s been a few skirmishes around here, but let me tell you a story about this lady who had a beef about something different.” Namechecking Missouri in the title is a nice shorthand for this issue. At first glance, we’re thinking the setting must be very important to the story but looking closer, nah, McDonagh almost always uses geographic names in his titles (Bruges, Inishmaan, Lenane, Spokane, Connemara – h/t Google).

            “I found complicity to be a central theme, though.”

            I totally concede this now that you lay it out, though it pretty much retreats into subtext following the monologue (which, admittedly, is a huge textual element in every sense). The complicity angle is a great one, but I don’t see the characters, in the end, being motivated by or reckoning with it like they do with grief and revenge. That’s part of what weakens the racial aspect.

            “To be white, and to benefit from your whiteness, is to be complicit in the crimes of whiteness.”

            And here’s where I think you’ve arrived at a good insight on the subtext that I do not think the film goes so far to contain. I think it’s important to state I like the film, but the way it goes out of its way to lean on racial elements while leaving them out of the final act, makes me unable to defend it to people who don’t like it on those grounds only. As you said (and I agree), it’s a problem not with what’s in there, but what isn’t. And if we’re talking about the culpability in complicity, that doesn’t leave the film in a very good spot.

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        Martin McDonagh’s play The Cripple of Inishman

        At first I read this as “The Cripple of Irishman” and thought, “Wow, Martin McDonagh made a play about that worker young Mr. Burns ran into over and over with a go-kart?”

        • The Ploughman

          You’re thinking of the Flaharety film-within-the-play Man of Aran-him-over-with-a-go-kart.

          I’m here all week with Inishmaan deep cut humor, ladies and gents.

    • The Narrator

      The Informant!: Or the story of literally every single person who leaves the Trump administration. On this viewing, I fully realized what a masterclass this is in the art of reaction shots (my favorite is Joel McHale bolting to attention when Whitacre first mentions the kickbacks), and was reminded of the greatness of everything else (Damon rightfully gets the most attention, but Scott Bakula and Melanie Lynskey are so good in this, with Lynskey’s delivery of “You need to stop doing this to yourself” just breaking my heart in two).

    • Conor Malcolm Crockford

      Up to Episode 8 of Rome. Caesar is just a fucking machine of ownage in this episode, from his maneuvering of Cleopatra back to the throne to the immortal “SIT…DOWN.” (Hinds is KILLER in this). But of course so is Cleopatra, and there’s delicious irony in Caesar’s masculinity not really letting him recognize when he’s being seduced and conquered himself (Oh honey, you think she’s your slave?)

      Watching End of the Fucking World and enjoying it enormously. This is teenage Tarantino done right, deepening the characters as it goes and showing both the futility of this kind of fucked up rebellion but also how badly both of them need it and how damaged James and Alyssa are. Up to Episode 6.

      • Miller

        The wall of heads here is fucking awesome.

        • Conor Malcolm Crockford

          The cuts to them being mounted was a pretty simple way to indicate story changes and kind of blackly funny (similarly Ptolemy II drowned in the Nile, which is almost certainly what actually happened to him).

          • Miller

            Oh, it’s definitely hilarious. Some poor Egyptian is constantly resetting the “It Has Been X Days Since A Beheading” sign.

    • Quinn the Eskimo

      Exorcist II: The Heretic – this is not a particularly smart movie, or anywhere near a sane one, but I’ll be damned if I didn’t at least kinda like it. As with the first film, there’s a sort of nightmare logic to the proceedings, but this time it’s more akin to Italian horror, hurling out utterly gonzo plot twists and images whenever it possibly can. It’s not a good movie per se, but it still manages to offer something wholly unique for a Hollywood blockbuster. If you’ve ever wanted to see Linda Blair get psychically stoned during an extended tap dance number, then this is the movie for you. (And if that doesn’t draw you in, MORRICONE SCORE.)

    • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

      Bender’s Big Score and Bender’s Game. You talked me into watching a couple of Futurama movies. I agree that BG doesn’t hold together as a movie. BBS is better as a whole. Some choice quotes:

      From BBS:

      Hermes: “Without my body, I’m a nobody!”

      Bender: “I support and oppose many things, but not strongly enough to pick up a pen.”

      Professor Farnsworth: “Time travel is impossible!”
      Fry: “But Professor, you time traveled yourself. Remember? When we went back to Roswell?”
      Professor Farnsworth: “That proves nothing! And furthermore, you’d think I could remember a thing like that! Plus, who are you anyway?”

      From BG:

      Leegola: “What else can we slay? Is that a hobbit over there?”
      Titanius Anglesmith: “No, that’s a hobo and a rabbit. But they’re making a hobbit.”

      “If you die here you’ll really be dead. But instead of science, we believe in crazy hocus-pocus. It’s like Kansas.”

      Professor Hubert Farnsworth: “There’s just one small problem – and it’s a big one.”

    • Rosy Fingers

      Harmontown – Christ, what an asshole.

      Parting Glances – Enjoyable enough, if a little playlike – lots of medium shots in front of apartment walls. Babyface Steve Buscemi was wonderful, just drawing your attention in every scene he’s in. His first movie role, apparently, and that odd charisma was already firmly in place. The rest of the movie serves as a nice portrait of mid-eighties New York gay culture, I guess, but the movie’s a bit formless. I did enjoy hanging out in the party scene.

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        Harmontown – Christ, what an asshole.

        I briefly thought you wrote HarmonQuest, the Seeso series where they pretty much just put on D&D (but don’t call it that, legally speaking) games like they did on Harmontown and got confused, because I thought it was pretty funny. I mean, not that he’s not an asshole, I just didn’t think it was nearly as pronounced in that series.

        • Rosy Fingers

          Harmontown goes warts-&-all in its portrait of Harmon, but of course acknowledging that you’re a jerk doesn’t make you any less of a jerk. Especially when you make sure to cut every ten minutes to talking heads praising your genius.

    • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

      Keeping this short because there is one particular note I want to get in there. Might have more to say later.

      The Mick, “The Trip.”

      L.A. to Vegas, “Pilot.” I’ll be honest, my expectations had been lowered quite a bit from the early buzz, so I was surprised to find how much I laughed out at this. And that cast is no joke (Dylan McDermott and Peter Stormare are the big names, but everyone else does great, particularly apparent lead Kim Matula). Will stick with until it starts to suck or gets cancelled.

      (Speaking of Tuesday nights, R.I.P. The Mayor, which was fun and had potential but never found an audience.)

      Old stuff I keep forgetting to share:

      Community, “Grifting 101” and “Wedding Videography.” “It’s you against the world. And you will not win. But you get to make your moves. Not them.”

      It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, “Mac Day.” Lord, I could say so much about this episode, but I think the best summary of Mac as a character might be “There’s nothing badass about breaking the law!”

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        Oh, I’d forgotten to mention that I recently watched the premiere of Grown-ish, the Black-ish spin-off. It was… fine, but the tone and life lessons of the show are clearly pitched at 18-year-olds, and I am not an 18-year-old.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        “I know we’ve never said this as a group but Mac is gay, right?”

        I love how the Gang is less annoyed about Mac being gay and really that he just won’t admit it and thus is constantly forcing them to indulge in his repressed urges.

        Also LA To Vegas’ previews were surprisingly funny, especially McDermott. I’m not expecting a GREAT show but probably a fun one.

  • ZoeZ

    This is a great piece–the suits are always what I think of when I think of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, a movie I didn’t otherwise love until after I read the book. The suits are part of that, actually: there’s something fundamentally, if truthfully, grim about the way all the characters who indulge in color or fun are either on the wrong side–Haydon–or have to give up superfluous things for the sake of the job–Guillam, breaking up with his boyfriend. The book made Smiley more real to me in a way that it felt like he still had a self existing under all the work of the Circus, whereas in the movie, I always feel like Oldman plays him as being honed down to spycraft and morality alone, and that makes him victorious while also making him a little depressing, like his joy is the price the West paid to win the Cold War. Which is interesting but hard to love.

    (I would also always give the book points for somehow pulling off the feat of making “the guy who slept with your wife is also the traitor” plot twist not feel at all like cheap wish fulfillment, mostly, again, because of Smiley’s vulnerability: despite everything, he doesn’t want Haydon to be the spy.)

    I never would have noticed the turtleshell glasses, but I love that detail–and I love how in that screencap, they almost blend in with the walls of the Circus meeting room, indicating that Smiley’s still too much a part of the organization then to have the necessary perspective on it to find the mole.

    • Conor Malcolm Crockford

      The book also uses Hayden’s sleeping with Anne not to make Smiley vengeful but vulnerable. It’s a great characterization, that his response to that would be to cut off all emotional feeling about that in his search (which actually makes the hunt harder).

      • Also, the great touch that not only does Haydon do it to make Smiley vulnerable, but that Karla orders him to. It tells you just what level Karla plays on, and–in Smiley’s People–how Smiley will have to force himself on to that level to beat him.

  • The Ploughman

    Thank you for that extra push I need to watch the TTSS copy that I’ve had sitting in the queue for too long.