Young-Mr-Lincoln-Direction3

New on DVD and Blu-Ray

Not gonna lie, this is not a great week for home video. When Stanley Kramer movies are among the most enticing releases in a given week, something is wrong (although Inherit the Wind at least has the reputation of being the one that even the most fervent Kramer detractors will admit is good). The top title is undoubtedly the release of Andres Muschietti’s smash-hit adaptation of It, which I didn’t see, but I assume the clown was scary in it, and I assume the same thing of Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House (that clown being the clowns in the White House and Congress amirite?). The rest of the new titles are pretty dire, to the point that The Foreigner is probably an easy second-place finisher, trailing behind it the twofer of mediocre political-figure biopics Mark Felt and Marshall, plus the My Little Pony movie and a movie called November Criminals, which was so good that it basically went straight-to-VOD despite starring Ansel Elgort, Chloe Grace Moretz, Catherine Keener, and David Strathairn. Catalog titles are a little better, mostly on the basis of Criterion releasing John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincoln, as well as Arrow giving us the Italian anthology film The Witches, boasting contributions from Pier Paolo Pasolini, Luchino Visconti, and Vittorio De Sica.

The Foreigner (Universal)
Friend Request (Lionsgate)
Inherit the Wind (Kino)
Intermezzo: A Love Story (Kino)
It (Warner)
Judgment at Nuremberg (Kino)
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House (Sony)
Marshall (Universal)
My Little Pony: The Movie (Lionsgate)
November Criminals (Sony)
The Witches (Arrow)
Young Mr. Lincoln (Criterion)

  • Glorbes

    What did we watch last night?

    • Zombie and the Ghost Train – my second Mika Kaurismaki film, a director who I am only really interested in because I’m a fan of his brother, which is always a strange place to start. This one has a lot going for it, it’s a meandering character study of a young bassist with drinking problems that has a kind of Jim Jarmusch vibe to it. The deadpan humour and musical setting is familiar from Aki’s films but it never quite clicked with me in the same way. That said, it does have a band called Harri & The Mulefukkers in it, so I’m glad I gave it a shot.

      • Babalugats

        So there’s no zombies or ghost trains in the movie? I’m not saying every movie needs a ghost train, but you shouldn’t get my hopes up like that of you’re not going to deliver.

        • Miller

          “I’ve got this great movie about a sad drunk bassist! I call it Rootless!”
          “…yeah, no. We’re gonna go with a title that will at least trick a few people into thinking they’re watching a Scooby Doo movie.”

        • Delmars Whiskers

          When are they gonna get to the zombie and/or ghost train factory?

        • The main character is nicknamed Zombie, Ghost Train are a legendary, mysterious local band (“they get a lot of gigs, but nobody has heard them play”) who weave in and out of the story.

          Frankly I’m disappointed that they didn’t just call the movie Harri and the Mulefukkers and be done with it.

          • Babalugats

            Wait, do they fuck a mule in this movie?!

          • I’m assuming there’s a deleted scene.

    • Drunk Napoleon

      LOST, Season Four, Episodes Twelve, Thirteen, and Fourteen, “There’s No Place Like Home”
      “They’re referring to you as the Oceanic Six. That’s not the best branding as far as we’re concerned, but it’s catchy.”

      “How many times do I have to tell you, John? I always have a plan.”

      “You know, Jack. You know that you’re here for a reason. You know it. And if you leave this place, that knowledge is gonna eat you alive from the inside out…until you decide to come back.”

      “Who told you you could eat those peanuts?”
      “May I eat these peanuts?”
      “I’m gonna keep my eye on you, Shorty.”

      “You can go now, Michael.”
      “Who are you?”

      “Jack, we can’t pull it off.”
      “Just let me do the talking.”

      Each of these episodes has a distinct feel. Part I feels like everything is converging, literally in the sense that almost everybody is coming down on the Orchid, but also in the sense that we have the shortest distance between flashback/forward and on-island drama, when we start with the Oceanic Six just after they’ve been picked up – by which I mean the timelines are coming together. Part II feels like cleanup – the Oceanic Six flashforwards explain that Bearded Jack’s scenes are set three years after the Six get off the island. Part III feels like everything we’ve been warned about is coming crashing down on us, and it’s coming right now – in big ways, like finally seeing what happens to Jin, how the Oceanic Six get off the island, and what will reunite everyone off-island, but also in small ways, like how the helicopter is running out of fuel. We have no time on any front.

      Characters saying either hello or goodbye to each other gets me every single time the show reaches for that well; it’s hilarious to me that I’m so moved by Jack and Hurley reuniting on the island even though they’ve been hanging out in the flashforwards all the time. We also see James and Hurley coming back together, and it’s sweet. Less movingly but equally momentous is Jack and John having one of their old-fashioned conversations for the first time in like a season. And, of course, Desmond reunites with Penny – it was funny to me that I cannot for the life of me recall what happened to Desmond in seasons five and six.

      This is the point where Ben moves the fucking island, and not only was the sequence itself totally boss (love the little ripple of the where the island used to be), it helped click the exact point of the mythology into place: it’s a way to simplify the logistics. Ben moves the island by first fucking around with some Dharma tech, then turning the frozen donkey wheel (dibs on the band name); we don’t know exactly what he’s doing beyond the purpose and the effect. The problem of logistics is solved by obscuring it.

      I spent all season trying to remember what happened to the non-main survivors, and apparently they were all killed on the freighter.

      We actually get a short sequence of three characters with daddy issues resolving them. Hurley’s dad is revealed to be decent, Sun owns her dad by taking his company, and Jack literally buries his father.

      Ownage: Sun owns her father by taking control of his company. The Others just murder the piss out of Keamy’s team, with Richard specifically seeming to kill Keamy. Ben murders the piss out of Keamy.

      • Drunk Napoleon

        Addendum: after a few more minutes of unpacking my emotional reaction, my god does the melodrama of this show appeal to me. Jack’s beardy despair, Sun’s horror at seeing the boat with Jin on it explode, Sawyer jumping off the helicopter, Penny and Desmond’s reuniting, and of course every time a character says hello or goodbye; I love the big broad emotions of it to bits.

        • These episodes are absolutely everything you want from TV drama: plotlines that have been set in motion for years all organically and gracefully coming together in payoff after payoff.

          And I’m kinda glad you forgot about Desmond ‘cuz he’s gonna do some way cool shit in season five.

    • I realized I have watched two new-to-me feature length movies since Thanksgiving: Bio-Dome and Chappie.

      I don’t think I mentioned Bio-Dome, but, until this movie, I can’t remember ever siding with the snobs in the snobs vs slobs formula (even when presented from the point of view of the snob dealing with an annoying slob). This time, I was with the snobs from Frame One and wondered if anybody would convict the scientists or girlfriends had they had the sense to kill Pauly Shore and Stephen Baldwin and eat them for dinner. As soon as the snobs started siding with the slobs, the movie became ingratiating.

      Last night, I saw a clip show of Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. For as awful as that movie is, and it’s truly terrible, one forgets that Aerosmith’s rendition of Come Together and Earth Wind and Fire were even in the movie. Or that Steven Tyler strangles Peter Frampton. But, for every good number, there’s 50 minutes of ear shattering poorly acted shit to get through.

      • Glorbes

        Pauly Shore has that effect on people.

        • I will still defend Son-In-Law. But that’s about it. I have not returned to Encino Man.

          • Miller

            I have not seen Encino Man in decades but memory tells me it is far more Brendan Fraser’s breakout as opposed to a standard Shore flick.

          • Rosy Fingers

            I think it was both Fraser’s and Shore’s breakout, though only one of them deservedly.

        • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

          Who would have thought that a guy whose career breaks came because his mother founded and ran the Comedy Store would turn out to be a lame performer?

      • Also, the opening credits sequence of Bio-Dome reminded me of the credits sequence of Winona Ryder’s intimate project in Reality Bites after the MTV executives got a hold of it.

      • Miller

        Is Bio-Dome the ur-90s comedy? Besides the presence of Shore, the plot is based around something ridiculously period-specific in concept and also philosophy – instead of a web-based utopia forced upon society (the current Silicon Valley mode) tech/science turns inward and narrow to theoretically benefit all. Not to mention the end of history aspect of needing to create an environment for Shore to destroy, implying that everything in the real world is pretty damn hunky dory.

        • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

          You just gave more thought to Bio-Dome than the makers of Bio-Dome ever did.

        • The Ploughman

          This begs the question – which is the most 90s Paula Shore movie? Bio-Dome as Miller eloquently states? In the Army Now where foreign combat is a lark and a distraction? Jury Duty which is just a parody of the OJ trial? Can’t imagine why his career hasn’t aged so well.

          • Miller

            Oh man, Pauly Shore movies as the secret history of the 1990s. We’ve either stumbled upon the hidden truth of the end of the American century or Greil Marcus’ personal hell.

          • At least with In the Army Now and Jury Duty, they were clowning on something that deserved to be clowned (easy targets though they might be). I also think our army should still be clowned on, but we’re still in a kind of post-9/11 pro-military aftershock.

          • The Ploughman

            Yeah, a Paula Shore military comedy today would end with the cast members saluting some real-life veterans while a choir of children sings God Bless America. Which might actually be more insulting to the military.

          • This is the second time you wrote Paula Shore and I wonder what a female Pauly Shore would have been like. Jenny McCarthy?

          • The Ploughman

            ”Damn you, autocorrect!” he says, to hide his decades-old fantasy of a sexy lady Pauly Shore.

            We’d probably never hear about whoever the female Pauly Shore was in the 90s.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            Kennedy if she’d kept her frizzy MTV hair and gone into comedy instead of Fox News.

          • Miller

            Not saying the mockery in Bio-Dome is well done but military service and especially the duty to serve on a jury are basic civil functions, why do they deserve to be clowned on more than anything else, including science? Culturally science does not have the broad history of being honored the way the other two do (there’s a ton of yay good guy war and yay jury doing the right thing movies) so a bad clowning sticks out much more but I’m OK with science clowning, even in a Shore-esque idiot way, in theory.

          • Simply because science currently doesn’t hold nearly the place of honor that the military does or the justice system did. If the military and American judicial system didn’t have such an inflated sense of importance, they wouldn’t make such ripe targets. It’s one thing to clown on a stodgy institution that rarely suffers attacks from a high level. It’s another to clown on an industry (environmental science) regularly attacked for being fake or of having no benefit.

          • Miller

            Very fair. It bugs me because science in general is mechanically suited to stupid comedy (complicated equipment/processes + incompetence = laffs) and the closed and complicated system of a bio-dome in particular actually seems like a ripe setting. But other factors always come into play. Weird morality gets applied, which works if William Atherton is involved (and is actually poignant in Real Genius) but usually is just stupid contrivance to create unnecessary bad guys, see the EVIL CORPORATE WEATHER TEAM in Twister. And the dumbness of the protagnists, which is fine for comedic purposes, is rewarded for dramatic ones – doesn’t Shore come up with a plan that saves the bio-dome or something? It implicitly says that these eggheads should’ve listened to the regular guy instead of getting mad at him for trashing their toys.

          • The Ploughman

            All of the slobs vs snobs comedy lost a lot of luster in hindsight (see also Gilmore, Happy) when a sizable portion of population started to mistake the ignorance and rudeness as the heroic qualities rather than the joke.

        • It’s the corporate-90s comedy. Somebody saw PCU and thought, “what if we put Pauly Shore in this? And what if, instead of obnoxious liberal college students, we have scientists trying to accomplish something. Because, Bio-Domes are useless, amirite?! And let’s add in a bit of creepy molestation just for laughs. Because, wimmen scientists…right guys??”

          This fucking movie. Ugh. Ugh ugh ugh.

          • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

            Little know fact about Bio-Dome, Alec Baldwin told Stephen Baldwin not to take the role because it would destroy his career. Thankfully he turned out to be right.

      • But what of Chappie? Did you love Chappie as much as I unexpectedly did, finding myself on a rollercoaster of Die Antwoord music videos from which I never really recovered?

        • That thing was a messy mess mess. Like, what do you get if you meld Short Circuit 2 with Robocop with a Disney talking animal movie and then make it hard R? I loved it because it made such terrible decisions at every turn.

          • It’s spectacularly messy in such a compellingly weird way. I was genuinely devastated when I learned that Neill Blomkamp had plans for a sequel that he’ll never get to make, because his movie had no clear audience whatsoever, no idea what it was trying to be, and made no money. Sigh.

    • ZoeZ

      Episodes three and four of Mindhunter: The Hunter of Minds. Bill Tench continues to be the quiet star of these episodes, and I like his emerging protectiveness of Holden and how it complicatedly ties into his relationship with his son. Overall, I’m enjoying it, but thus far Debbie is the worst case of Woman Stands Near Law Enforcement that I’ve been recently subjected to.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        Debbie just doesn’t work as a character – her whole arc is really weird and lopsided and its like the show can’t decide if there’s something off here about the relationship or if she’s the one great thing in Holden’s life. Unfortunately it leans more into the latter which makes her a sketch of ideas, not a person.

        • ZoeZ

          I don’t know if it’s the writing or the acting or a combination of both, but they never come across to me as a couple that would last together even for a year.

    • The Ploughman

      The College Football National Championship, where the perennial champion wins after arbitrarily being given an extra chance over other deserving teams. College football would seem more and more like a metaphor for an elite class luring the masses in with perpetual unfulfilled promises of opportunity while using the system to further their own gain, except it’s also literally that.

    • Last episode of season one of Monk, which was a bit weird with Tim Daly inexplicably playing himself and Monk having no idea what Wings was, and Monk finding a murder mystery in a flight to Newark. Overall the first season tends to be entertaining but after a while it does get repetitive. Probably time for a break before season two.

    • jroberts548

      The college football national championship, in which my law alma mater, as well as the alma mater of the Dissolve’s Scott Tobias and Noel Murray, inexplicably lost to a team that didn’t even win their conference! Because Alabama should have never been there, I pettily refuse to recognize them. Congratulations to the UCF Knights!

      • Son of Griff

        Alabama deserves a pass for not electing Roy Moore, however.

        • jroberts548

          1.) Georgia also did not elect Roy Moore.
          2.) They voted him back on the state Supreme Court after he got kicked out, he got kicked out of the court, and still he almost won the senate seat.

    • Quinn the Eskimo

      The Exorcist – there’s a strange sort of matter-of-factness to the horror in this movie that I don’t think I’ve ever really seen anywhere else. There’s almost no music, fancy visuals or heavy editing during the more horrific sequences. Instead, everything is center of frame and grounded within the reality of the narrative, even when heads start spinning and pea soup starts flying. The end result feels uncannily like nightmare logic, where you feel that something irrational and impossible is rational and possible and yet it scares you nonetheless. God, this movie is great.

      • Quinn the Eskimo

        Also, I did a lot of Personal Writing last night, as I managed to have a relatively major breakthrough on a script a few days ago (thank God). I had all the pieces outlining the rest of the narrative in place, but the only thing stopping me was an extended dialogue scene that I never quite felt happy with. I couldn’t remove it, either. The scene comes after one of the most intense moments in the script, and it’d only be right for the audience to have some kind of breather before things pick back up.

        Fortunately, I figured out how to fix the scene – steal copiously from 3:10 to Yuma! Westerns have become a larger source of influence on this script than I initially expected, so I decided to roll with it and riff off the manipulative-but-also-friendly relationship between Ben Wade and Dan Evans. Adding that contradictory dynamic (plus a few fun touches of worldbuilding) helped the scene out vastly, and now it’s one of my favorite parts of the script.

    • The Narrator

      Did not watch anything, but I can now confirm that the second 20th Century Women piece will be published tomorrow at 11 ET. Be there, or don’t be there, it’s totally up to you.

      • clytie

        When will the third, forth and twentieth be published? I need to mark my calendar.

        • The Narrator

          You jest, but the third will be published on the 19th.

          • clytie

            I wasn’t kidding. I find your enthusiasm charming and infectious.

    • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

      Most of the CFB National Championship, which was fun until Alabama inevitably won yet again, the second championship they’ve won under Saban after they couldn’t even be bothered to win the SEC. Five titles in nine years for Alabama threatens to make college football dreadfully dull.

      Ghosted, “Snatcher.” Some mixed feelings about this one. On the one hand, it’s good to see Leroy have concerns about Max that aren’t skepticism over the supernatural, which was getting ridiculous, and Amber Stevens West’s Annie really fits well into the Robinson/Scott riffing dynamic. On the other hand, a lot of parts of the episode kinda fell flat, and it didn’t really make sense that Max felt the need to seem like a macho outdoorsman to Annie, who was clearly interested in him when he was an obvious dork.

      I didn’t post my weekend watch. NFL Playoffs were the story of the day there. I don’t think I’ve ever felt as good about a decision to sleep through a half of a playoff game as I did with Buffalo-Jacksonville, given that when I woke up it was still 0-0. I had to miss some of the Rams-Falcons game for work, but that one surprised me a little. (The evidence is mounting for the NFC South as the league’s toughest division; a Saints-Falcons championship game isn’t out of the question.) I watched the Saints look like the better team for most of the game against the Panthers before hanging on to win; I watched the Chiefs blow a lead to an inferior team while managing to not score a single second-half point, because Andy Reid has an obsession with not doing what works once he has a lead and with mismanaging the game clock.

      Friday night was spent watching the return of the NBC Thursday shows– Great News, Superstore, and The Good Place— and then Friday night’s own Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. Not a lot to add there: These shows are still good. (Although The Good Place reminds me, I need to make that Jason GIF.)

      Sunday night watched some old Superstore largely out of laziness.

      Oh, I left off in my last post that I watched the latest episode of The Mick, which was pretty good. Sabrina throws a fundraiser to try to get in with the NYC art scene; Ben befriends Jennie Garth’s obnoxious son, and Mickey and Alba see this as their way to social-climb into the ranks of hobnobbing with 90s TV celebrities. Meanwhile, Chip spends a weekend with his father (well, with his biological one– actually, that should read “his apparent biological father”) and actually sort-of proves himself, although not with a mess of hilarious Chip-like incompetence first.

    • Rosy Fingers

      Beware the Slenderman – an HBO crime documentary about a pair of 12-year-olds who stabbed their friend almost to death in an attempt to appease the Slenderman and gain access to his magical mansion. At two hours it was a bit over-long and the blurb promised more of a sociological history of the Slenderman meme than what was delivered. Instead it was mostly a talking head doc about the effect the crime had on the two girls’ families, with a very brief sideline into Deviant Art, Creepypasta and other internet phenomena. Still, it was fascinating to see how the U.S. court system can choose to try 12-year-olds as adults because, well, just because, the crime seems bad you know?

      Baby Driver – this didn’t quite click for me. The ultra-stylisation of the matching movement to music conceit never quite hit the cool button for me and tended to lean rather heavily on the wankery button. Overall it was pretty good as a basic crime caper and I enjoyed many of the performances, but I doubt I’ll revisit this one.

      Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters – As far as these CGI kids confections go, this was pretty ok. More sprightly than the Narnia movies, it moved along, did what it was supposed to and didn’t get bogged down in over-long climax fatigue. Definitely more fun and interesting than the post-apocalyptic dirges like Maze Runner, The 5th Wave and Divergent, etc.

      • Babalugats

        That slenderman story is so demoralizing. Just a long slow tragedy, happening right in the open, and nobody cares to stop it. I don’t understand how you can charge a 12 year old as an adult. And a 12 year old with severe untreated schizophrenia, at that. To argue on the one hand that these girls couldn’t tell the difference between make-believe and reality, and on the other that they are hardened killers beyond any hope of redemption… What’s the tone of the doc? I was curious when it was announced, but I’m not particularly interested in the leering tabloid take on the story. Even marketing it on the slenderman stuff seems questionable to me.

        Also agree with your take on Baby Driver ie, wankery.

        • Rosy Fingers

          It’s not especially leering, as far as true crime docs go. It spends a lot of time with the parents, who seem like reasonable people baffled by the circumstances in which they find themselves but also fairly clear-headed about what happened. There’s a lot of time spent also with video of the police interviews, in which the girls clearly do not comprehend what they’ve gotten themselves into. All of which is to imply that these were children, not adults. The film holds off the reveal of the schizophrenia until the final act, which seems like a bit of a cheat, but it does serve to further drive home the tragedy of the situation.

  • Babalugats

    Inherit The Wind blows

    • Glorbes

      Like a strong gust, or a gentle breeze?

      I actually kind of like that movie. But, I also saw it in grade 12 in English class, and it was much more enjoyable than the class reading the play out loud. Though my rendition of Matthew Harrison Brady could *probably* give Frederic March a run for his money.

      • Babalugats

        It blows like two aging windbags spewing hot air over each other for the slowest two hours and eight minutes ever caught on film.

        I think you’re selling your classmates short.

        • Delmars Whiskers

          But would a high school English class have non-dancing Gene Kelly or Colonel Potter? I think not.

          • Babalugats

            How can you cast Gene Kelly in the movie and not have a ballet dream sequence that traces the genesis of humanity? It’s the most basic prerequisite for the genre!

          • Miller

            Oh my god Gene Kelly in a giant fish costume washes up out of the sea and flops around for a minute and then gets into a rhythm and then flips upright and starts to dance as he sheds scales and fins for appendages and maybe a top hat and cane WHY DID THIS NOT HAPPEN

          • Delmars Whiskers

            And after this number, the movie continues as if it hadn’t just been interrupted by a dream ballet.

          • Jake Gittes

            Frame it as Judy Garland’s sexual fantasy. With her maybe playing the same character she did in Judgment at Nuremberg.

          • Delmars Whiskers

            It’s the Stanley Kramer Cinematic Universe!

    • ZoeZ

      I will give it some points because I was strongly warned off listening to anything about evolution as a kid and seeing this movie was therefore the most complex discussion of that I came across for a while.

    • Son of Griff

      I was going to relate a touching story about how much this movie meant to me in my late elementary school and junior high years, but this thread is just too profound to ruin with my mawkish sentimentality.

  • Miller

    The Foreigner is a solid piece of work from Campbell, Chan and Brosnan down, I don’t know if it’s an own but it’s definitely worth a watch. And there’s a nice dark undertone of criticizing people who have been out of the game trying to get back in, which is nicely meta.

  • Jake Gittes

    I’d recommend The Foreigner over It. Unfussy old-school craftsmanship > flashy and loud modern studio horror, plus it’s got one of last year’s few standout scores courtesy of Cliff Martinez.

    • Miller

      Foreigner recommendation jinx! And yes, that score is excellent.

  • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

    (With apologies to Abbot & Costello)

    A curtain opens. Two men are standing on stage.

    Man 1: Have you seen It?

    Man 2: Have I seen what?

    Man 1: It.

    Man 2: What?

    Man 1: The movie.

    Man 2: What movie?

    Man 1: It.

    Man 2: That’s what I’m asking.

    Man 1: It is the name of the movie.

    Man 2: What is?

    Man 1: It!

    Man 2: There’s a movie called It?

    Man 1: That’s what I’m saying.

    Man 2: What is It about?

    Man 1: A monster terrorizing a group of kids.

    Man 2: They should have called It Them!

    Man 1: They already made Them!

    Man 2: Who did?

    Man 1: They did.

    Man 2: I haven’t seen it.

    Man 1: Which? It or Them!?

    Man 2: Both.

    Man 1: Do you want to see It?

    Man 2: I would rather see Them!

    Man 1: We can see It and then Them!.

    Man 2: Okay. Let’s see It.

    Man 1: Let’s see what?

    Man 2: It.

    Man 1: What?

    Man 2: What’s on second. I don’t know on third.

    Man 1: Two…weeks. Two…weeks. Two…weeks.

    Man 2: Who’s on first?

    Man 1: Fatal error. Fatal error. System shutting down.

    The two men begin to shake and sputter. Flames shoot from their eyes as their skin melts away revealing that they are robots. The curtain closes.

    Ben Brantley of The New York Times declares, “Huh?”

    • Miller

      Sir, I am from Hollywood and would like to buy the rights to this production, provided we can turn it into the Confused Burning Theater Robot Cinematic Universe.

      • Delmars Whiskers

        *First entry in the Confused Burning Theater Robot movie is released, flops, entire franchise is cancelled.*

        • Miller

          We shouldn’t have cast Aaron Eckhart as the robot.

          • Delmars Whiskers

            That’s okay, we’ll do a TV reboot with Alex O’Loughlin.

          • Him?

          • Delmars Whiskers

            Spike Lee angrily retweets Alex McArthur’s home address. (This gag appears by special arrangement with a 2013 AV Club commentary thread.)

    • Jake Gittes

      You could even expand this by incorporating the other It into it. It is the 1927 movie in which Clara Bow has “it”, that’s what it is.

      • The Ploughman

        Not to mention The Thing. Mind if we do a little punch-up on this? Akiva Goldsman, come on in here.

      • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

        What is “it”? Is “it” IBS?

        • Jake Gittes

          It’s just “it”, y’know? You either have it or you don’t have it.

          • Delmars Whiskers

            I used to be with it. Then they changed what it was. Now what I’m with isn’t it, and what’s it seems weird and scary to me.

    • You could also work What? into this routine except that movie and everything in it should never be spoken of again.

      • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

        What? There’s a movie called What?? Also there’s Her and They. Oh and M.

        • What is the What?, you ask? This is what the What? is, and don’t say I didn’t warn you.

          • Delmars Whiskers

            And Mario Bava’s The Whip And The Body was originally released in America as What, thus providing more hilarious, face-melting confusion.

          • The Voice of A Gnu Generation

            Hmmm, you know I’m beginning to think that Polanski fellow might be a little…odd.

    • Babalugats

      One ticket for It.
      For what?
      No, I’ve already seen it.
      Then why are you buying a ticket?
      Because I haven’t seen It
      But you just said…
      Can you just give me the ticket!
      For what?!
      No!
      I’m sorry that’s sold out.

  • Son of Griff

    While it no longer corresponds to my tastes and preferences, INHERIT THE WIND is the movie that probably had the biggest influence on my intellectual life. To my sixth grade self it summarized my growing skepticism with religion and my trust in rationality. It also cemented my growing interest in individual rights and freedom of expression. The movie also got me motivated to read up on Clarence Darrow, which introduced me at a tender age to labor and working class history that was not surprisingly excised from my Orange County CA curriculum, thus introducing me to a field of knowledge beyond the realm of formal education. All of these factors formed my young adult identity, and while I can’t say that the movie caused me to think on the way that I do, it definitely pointed me in the direction of how to express my principles and values. Today I recognize the horrible reductionism of the film’s presentation of the Scopes trial, as well as a pronounced ponderousness in the presentation, but, for me at least, the picture transcends its limitations.

    • Glorbes

      For what it’s worth, I liked it when I saw it.