roman_j_israel_civil_rights_activism_dan_gilroy

New on DVD and Blu-Ray

We’ve got a genuinely pretty good home video slate this week, headlined by Criterion celebrating Valentine’s Day with the definitive releases of those two most romantic horror movies, Night of the Living Dead and The Silence of the Lambs (Criterion will be having a flash sale today, so you can them for half-off). And there’s yet more horror where that came from, with Scream Factory releasing a special edition of Sam Raimi’s Drag Me to Hell and the Warner Archive Collection wasting resources on the Texas Chainsaw Massacre sequel with Viggo Mortensen in it. Elsewhere in catalog titles, there’s Arrow’s box set of some of Seijun Suzuki’s early works and Kino’s 4K-remastered version of the original The Thomas Crown Affair, but some of this week’s more intriguing titles are new. There’s the first season of David Simon’s The Deuce, and the long-awaited Blu-Ray of Bertrand Bonello’s stylish terrorism thriller Nocturama, but I find myself most drawn to a much worse-reviewed film, namely Dan Gilroy’s Roman J. Israel, Esq. Gilroy’s follow-up to Nightcrawler, it was regarded as a mess straight out of the gate, to the point Denzel Washington’s Oscar nomination for it was a genuine surprise. But damned if it doesn’t sound like a fascinating mess, and Denzel going way off-kilter is as good a selling point as any.

Baby: Secret of the Lost Legend (Kino)
The Ballad of Lefty Brown (Lionsgate)
Blade of the Immortal (Magnolia)
The Deuce: The Complete First Season (HBO)
Drag Me to Hell (Shout Factory)
Eaten Alive! (Severin)
Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III (Warner Archive Collection)
Night of the Living Dead (Criterion)
Nocturama (Grasshopper)
Orchestra Rehearsal (Arrow)
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (Sony)
Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years, Vol. 1 – Seijun Rising: The Youth Movies (Arrow)
The Silence of the Lambs (Criterion)
The Thomas Crown Affair (Kino)
V.I. Warshawski (Kino)
Wonder (Lionsgate)

  • Drunk Napoleon

    What did we watch?

    • Drunk Napoleon

      LOST, Season Six, Episode Ten, “The Package”
      “Unless Richard’s covered in bacon grease, I don’t think Hurley can track anything.”
      “Hey! Don’t talk about bacon.”

      “What do you need a boat for? Can’t you just turn into smoke and fly your ass over the water?”
      “Do you think if I could do that, I would still be on this island?”
      “No, ’cause that would be ridiculous.”

      I really love the way we’ve been getting breadcrumbs of Smokey’s plan this season, from knowing the overall goal (get off the island), to knowing the exact method (take the Ajira plane), to now knowing why he’s doing it this exact way, trying to get everyone off the island with him (because the only way he can get off is if the island’s protector is also off, and he doesn’t know which of the candidates is actually the protector, and he can’t kill the island’s protector so just murdering all the candidates himself isn’t gonna work, so he might as well try diplomacy).

      Meanwhile, in the flashsideways, the show pretends at first that Sun and Jin aren’t together, setting off a wave of possibilities before quickly closing them off. Mikhail rocks up as a translator for Keamy! Then he gets shot in the eye, because the number one killer of fictional characters is poetry. Don’t be another statistic.

      Aside from the (hilarious) quote above, I love that the characters have apparently all just accepted that a sentient, murderous cloud of black smoke that’s apparently very old has taken the image of their dead frenemy. On the scale of Reality to David Lynch, the show started out one notch below ‘Marvel/DC superhero comic’, and now sits roughly around ‘anime’ but one notch below ‘the really weird anime’ and ‘New Wave science fiction books’.

      Ownage: Smokey’s team gets owned so that Widmore’s team can grab Jin. Alt-Jin murders the eye off Mikhail in a really badass suspense/action piece.

      The Sopranos, Season One, Episode Twelve, “Isabella”
      “And Napoleon, he was a moody fuck too.”

      “God, what am I saying at this poor woman’s wake.”

      “What’s he got to be depressed about?” – and there we have the reason for the show’s existence. This is a story about depression, and one specific part of the narrative of depression is that there’s a reason for it, like you’re broke or you spouse is leaving you or something. Tony is a mob boss who can do things we never could in our day-to-day lives, and yet he still feels depression, because depression doesn’t care how much money you have, or how stable your marriage is, or whether or not you get to own people. And it makes it even more plausible that the people around Tony are baffled that he sees a shrink, because icons don’t see shrinks. What does an icon have to be depressed about?

      Tony’s depression actions are very familiar – wearing the same clothes for too long, going around town just to feel like you’re moving, laying around (though that’s driven by the Prozac, which I’ve never taken). The fact that the ‘solution’ to this is his own survival is also familiar – it wasn’t an assassination attempt, but it did feel like a do-or-die situation that put me on the path to recovery. Tony and Melfi’s talk in the car brought me to tears, because I knew exactly what he was feeling (and I’ve been waiting all season for them to finally fully acknowledge what he does for a living; the game has changed between them).

      Which, helpfully, ties into something I was mulling over all day because of what we were talking about yesterday. Drama is universal, it’s egalitarian, it’s there for everyone. Literature has to work to reflect you back in some way to work; I deeply love Mad Men because it almost exactly shows the world as I see it, and I deeply love Cowboy Bebop because it shows a version of myself I wish I could be – not an idealised self, an alternate one. On the other hand, I’m primed to take lines and images and ideas out of context and use them as expressions of my own worldview; The Sopranos hasn’t fully done that yet (though that’s exactly what I did yesterday with TOOOOOOOOOOD!!!’s words), but I enjoy learning more of its language. I guess that’s what they mean by art being good if it makes you think.

      Christopher Outfit: A fisherman’s hat.
      Interesting Todd Note: Todd speaks of this episode together with the next, so I chose not to read it.
      Ownage: Donny gets his face murdered off. Tony’s attacker accidentally shoots his friend at point blank range, and Tony fights them off.
      Biggest laugh: “Can he hear through that ear?” it is a funny episode though.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        “Gabagool? Ovah heeeeeree!” God bless Little Stevie and his deliveries as Silvio.

        I think where I relate to Tony is probably in the sense of living in an era of decline that’s just been accelerated further in the Trump era compared to late Clinton. I don’t share a lot of Tony’s preoccupations and obsessions – WW II, being a father, marriage – but I see myself in his awareness that something is shifting and dying. I’m also more likely to tie that into politics than Tony would.

        As I get older, I relate more to Don personally – his fear of commitment, clear persistence of sex and love as factors of life that are terrible and wonderful, relationships with women, his hiding beneath a shell, and his alienation. I see more of my dad in Tony and watching it is a way to understand some of his own drives.

        Hilarity: Tony in his bathrobe saying casually “I’m going back to bed” as Livia keeps whining.

        • Drunk Napoleon

          To be clear, I’m not referring to characters, I’m referring to the shows’ visions – Mad Men is concerned with how people work, and finds a lot of affection and hope for them even through their worst deeds (by comparison, Cowboy Bebop is more concerned with sensation and technical ability, with people’s internal lives more of an afterthought). Don and Tony move within a world that has its own personality.

          Agreed on Tony – it’s weird how everyone’s dad is like that, and it’s hard not to relate to someone in a world in decline. I relate more to Don in how his intelligence works, and how he keeps getting preoccupied with symbols and ideas (and also his general irritability with social events).

    • Better Watch Out–For a horror comedy, Better Watch Out is willing to get extremely sadistic, and unlike a few other reviewers, I count that as a plus–it’s threading a pretty familiar needle here, but the extent of the ruthlessness in the film’s villain remains the film’s most reliable surprise, even when it’s clear what the movie’s game is (which, not to spoil too much, happens about half an hour in). I’m not sure if the way the movie juggles the staring-into-the-abyss nihilism of its villain with the winky appropriation of famous holiday movie beats (the movie has an extended homage to Home Alone, e.g., and on the non-holiday side, there’s a conversation piece involving Adventure Time characters that’s like the adolescent hell version of Reservoir Dogs‘s “Like a Virgin” bit) is entirely cohesive, but it works more often than not, even if the characters are either incoherent plot devices or staid archetypes. Fun and cringey times to be had by all, I’m sure.

      • In conversations I’ve had with other viewers, we’ve had arguments over the lead’s performance and the character he’s supposed to be. The majority of the people I talked to believed it was a bad performance of a character who was intended to be Ferris Bueller likable. The kid was never as slick or charming as they thought his character was supposed to be.

        On the other hand, I thought the kid was a sociopath and the actor played him like he thought he was this popular suave and charming guy but that he actually wasn’t. It’s a bit of a play on expectations, and there were disagreements on whether that was a bad performance or intentional.

        And, part of that plays into whether the movie actually condemns the lead or is having winking fun with a sexual predator. The holiday movie appropriation gives a winking nod to this being all a joke in good fun…but the content is sociopathic and rapey. It’s a dichotomy that never situated itself. I think, for me, it was the final shot that bugged me. It was rooted in the realism that a kid like this would get away with his actions. But, it was also a little too supportive of the character and saying this was all a joke.

        • Holy shit, I can’t imagine not viewing the kid as a sociopath. He fucking murders people and basically rapes his babysitter, and one of the final lines of the movie involves him shouting, “I know I’m fucked up!” or something to that effect. Maybe he’s a Ferris Bueller character, but only in the sense that people have been re-evaluating the character as a selfish prick recently.

          I can totally see the movie’s tone being problematic for that characterization, though. It’s very jokey and winky, and that’s a really jarring contrast (maybe fatally so) with the sociopathic sadism.

          By “final shot,” are you talking about the end of the movie where we find out that the babysitter survived, or the mid-credits stinger where he’s like “Let’s go to the hospital”? Because I loved the former, hated the latter.

          • The stinger with the Let’s Go To The Hospital line. It’s played as a meta joke, rather than the sociopathic statement it is.

            But, yeah, some of the people have stated that the character should have been played more smooth to pull off the comedy. These were very odd conversations because we were seeing the film’s intent from two very different angles.

    • New Jack City – or “stuff on my shelves that has stuff in common with The Wire: Part 2 of an ongoing series because I don’t want to let go”. Sure enough, there are many parallels here. Troubled cops trying to take down a seemingly untouchable drug lord, etc. BUT instead of gritty reality this is some kind of heightened insanity, with Wesley Snipes playing the drug chieftain as a cartoonish supervillain who lives in some kind of Gothic mansion. He gets all the good dialogue and gives pretty much the only decent performance in the film – Ice-T and especially Judd Nelson are absolutely awful and the film around them has a baffling freeform nature that kind of feels like a three-hour rise and fall epic chopped down to 90 minutes without any real thought. I can see why this has (or had) a cult following but it feels very much like the kind of film that needs to be seen by a group of friends clustered round a small TV in a teenage bedroom. Some of it is dated in quite an entertaining way, though, and Wesley Snipes does get a few all-time great one-liners.

      Futurama, “Cold Warriors” – I took today off work because I feel dreadful so this seemed like a fitting one to revisit, once I’d figured out the baffling confusion of the Futurama episode system (not sure if this is just a UK thing, but season 6 is split into season 5 and 6 for the DVDs, season 7 is called season 7 and 8, and the feature-length ones are only available in that format without a season number, which I kind of approve of because it’s easier to pretend they don’t exist). Anyway this is a good one, especially Fry’s father saluting a spacebound guinea pig.

    • Started this morning on what will likely be a slow rewatch of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly – it’s nearly 3 hours and I am watching it on my commute, so it will take time. But it’s episodic enough that this won’t harm the film at all. Probably won’t have much to say about it as I go along, but I think not much needs to be added by now.

      Star Trek Discovery – Vaulting Ambition: There are three distinct plotlines here, none of which merge yet, one of which seems to be ending in a fizzle, and only one of which is interesting. That one plot is also the only one that seems to develop the characters involved (Stamets and Hugh). The other plots are more about having endless twists and big reveals. 13 episodes in, I think that might the biggest flaw of Discovery (the failures of continuity and Trek-ness notwithstanding). We don’t have characters. We have plot delivery devices, albeit some are played by really good actors. The show is all plotting all the time, and as such it fails to give anyone but Stamets any actual growth unless the plot needs it. And one big reveal this week basically tells us that what we thought was change on the part of Captain Lorca is something else.

      Three episodes to go, and while I think this show has reached a basic level of entertainment, it has done little more. I don’t expect it to the rest of the way.

    • Conor Malcolm Crockford

      Another Period Jason Ritter continues to deserve an Emmy for his exuberantly stupid and childish performance as Frederick. “Moomoo and Poopoo?”

      Watched Cheers Season 1 all the way up to Part 2 of the finale, and I’ve loved how much they’ve built up to Sam and Diane getting together, their flirtations becoming more aggressive as they basically dare one another to make the first move. Long is hilariously funny at her best, really leaning into the character’s weird physicality, but Danson strikes these notes of vulnerability, like Sam for the first time in his masculine, controlled life actually wants someone and is surprised by those feelings, but also resigned to his own stubbornness.

      Masterpiece: “Pick A Con…Any Con”, a great episode of writing, direction (the camera genuinely builds suspense and still keeps it light), and Harry Anderson having a ball. What probably makes Harry work is that he’s a con man but he’s never malicious or mean – he’s just having some fun and if he pockets your money all the better.

    • The Heart Of A Gnu Generation

      The Devil’s Candy. You know how I’m always complaining that movies are too long? Well this one was too short. Rather than overstaying it’s welcome this movie says, “Hello, I must be going,” before I even have a chance to serve the drinks. (I guess in this analogy I’m having a movie over for a cocktail party.) Evidently there was a 90 minute cut that screened at film festivals, the one I watched was 80 minutes. I appreciate its brevity but I would have liked to have seen those extra 10 minutes. I guess I’m hard to please. In conclusion, Pruitt Taylor Vince as a lunatic in a red track suit is scary as hell. Between this, Identity, and pretty much every other movie I’ve seen him in, PTV plays crazy very well.

      • Every time I hear about this I get a bit angry, because I did see this at a festival and it immediately became one of my favourite horror films. Then the next thing I hear it’s being chopped to pieces and the version I saw and loved is probably going to be difficult to ever see again? Fuck that. Death to… whoever had that idea.

        • The Heart Of A Gnu Generation

          Have you seen the paired down version? What did they cut out?

          • I haven’t! I’m hoping there will be a blu-ray release with both cuts at some point but it didn’t feel like anything needed cutting to me so I’m reluctant to watch it again in a lesser version.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        Did you ever see him in Heavy? He is amazing as a heavyset, shy cook with a crush on Liv Tyler. Big watery eyes.

        • The Heart Of A Gnu Generation

          I haven’t seen Heavy. I think that movie and Nobody’s Fool is one of the rare instances where he doesn’t play a villain or a serial killer.

        • clytie

          He’s really great in in the forgotten TV series Murder One. He was so good that they gave him an Emmy even though nobody watched the show and his episodes were all burned off over the course of a few nights like a miniseries, and only because ABC was contractually obligated to air them.

    • Glorbes

      Two episodes into The Detectorists Season 2.

      I also watched a couple of episodes of The Simpsons from season 9. The one where Marge becomes a real estate agent (and Homer buys Snake’s car “Li’l Bandit”), which is ALSO the first appearance of Gil, if I’m not mistaken. Also, “Lisa the Skeptic”, which features Stephen J. Gould providing one of the funnier cameos on the show.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        Despite the late seasons serious decline, Gil is still pretty hilarious.

        • Glorbes

          My son has been watching through these seasons, and we got season 10 and 11 before season 9. There are a lot of funny episodes in these seasons.

          • There are episodes in these seasons that I didn’t like much years ago but seem pretty great now. The sole benefit to the more recent episodes being much, much worse!

          • Conor Malcolm Crockford

            There’s an Uncanny Valley vibe to the later ones of characters you love going through the motions of being themselves and its too strange and awkward.

          • The Heart Of A Gnu Generation

            I think because of the switch to HD, and the fact that it’s been on for so long, it’s almost as if the newer episodes of The Simpsons are like a reboot of the original series.

      • Drunk Napoleon

        “I’ll be honest with you, Lisa. I never did the tests.”

    • The Ploughman

      Best Worst Movie – It’s been many a year since I’ve seen Troll 2 but it left enough of an impression that this doc (made by the now-grown star of that film) still had its appeal. What appears like a fluff piece around the cult screenings of a strong candidate for Worst Movie Ever Made gets an added boost when the film’s writer and director show up and refuse to get in on the joke. Suddenly we understand how a self-important film with critical misunderstandings of American culture and the English language could come into being. The film becomes a strong argument for auteur theory.

      From there we revisit the film as a nexus of generally well-meaning people feeding dreams and egos for a few weeks in the early 80s. Getting to know one of the film’s other main characters, a jovial dentist who feeds off the attention of the crowds, is entertaining. Discovering that the actress who played his wife is now a shut-in who compares the film favorably to Casablanca is… also illuminating. BWM may not fit all these pieces into a cogent viewpoint on anything, but there’s worse ways to spend 90 minutes. Like rewatching Troll 2.

      • I saw this before I’d seen Troll 2, which I guess isn’t too uncommon, but felt a little odd. I really enjoyed it though, the dentist is a fun guy to spend time with. I guess there’s probably a decent subgenre of “good films about the making of bad films” at this point!

      • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

        Man that dentist dude was so charming. My favorite scene is him trying to sell the movie based on the irony of it being bad to people who don’t understand. First the local town folks, and then the British people at the horror convention. Shows an actual account of so-bad-its-good not working as a calculated tactic.

        • The Ploughman

          And the way he keeps trying to describe the line that brings down the house at the cult screenings (“You don’t piss on hospitality!”) No reaction from people (except slight confusion) when given out of context. I wish the movie had adopted the impossibility of intentionally driving audience response as its main theme. All the elements are there.

          • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

            Some distance probably would have helped. The director seems so in awe at what the movie has become, he just sort of offers up everything that happens as it happens on a platter without steering any sort of conversation. Footage of people having Troll 2 parties? nah cut that yo.

          • The Ploughman

            Yes! Important thing is to know that people are willing to do this on their own. Do not need to see the folding chairs go up for the twenty friends coming over.

    • The Narrator

      The Shield, “Fire in the Hole”: The relative timidity of “Riceburner” really comes into focus after watching this, which, in few words, does not fuck around. That ending, tho.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        Oh jesus, that last scene is REMARKABLE. “I have done everything you have asked of me and it has only gotten us deeper into shit!” That would be the climax of most tv series….but we’re only halfway in, yall.

      • “Goddammit, I know where to do it”–the sheer pain of Lem there has never left me, a good man pushed to do a bad thing, even the worst thing. And like @conormalcolmcrockford:disqus sez, this isn’t the worst, this isn’t even the worst of the fucking season. The Shield is just unmatched in how it takes all its characters, all their moralities, and has them run into collision after collision, and how those collisions escalate.

        • The Narrator

          This is a great Lem episode all around. I was going to mention the rare-for-the-show lyrical moment of him staring off at the birds while Vic and Dutch talk in the background, before everything else that happened in the episode happened.

          • No spoilers, but keep this post in mind for the rest of the season and the series.

    • A Talking Banana!?!

      Coherence (2013/14) – Very good! Also very confusing, but there’s a lot here to grasp onto, so I think this is one I’m going to be thinking about for a long time.

      • Glorbes

        The Dissolve gave that 4 stars I believe. I watched it based on their review, and I liked it. A very inventive little movie. It was directed by a concept artist from the Pirates of the Caribbean movies!

        • A Talking Banana!?!

          4 1/2 actually, and from Mike D’Angelo to boot.

      • It’s an impressively complex movie given how tiny the scope of pretty much everything besides the dialogue and performances is. If I’m remembering correctly, there’s basically just one location, right?

        • A Talking Banana!?!

          Yeah, it’s just the one house (apparently the director’s).

      • The Ploughman

        There’s a debate in my circle about if this film or Primer is king of the tiny budget sci-fi concept film. For me, even though I love Primer, this one hits an emotional level that Primer does not.

        • Drunk Napoleon

          Primer is awesome, but the first thirty minutes are entirely unnecessary to the story beyond their value to engineering nerds.

          • The Ploughman

            One thing about Primer (not sure if it’s a feature or a bug) is if you can go into it cold, the gradual realization of what the device does and its implications is magnificent. Of course this also means you’re sitting through a decent portion of those first thirty minutes with very little idea of what’s going on and why any of it matters. The summary descriptions of the film unfortunately generally take away the option of not know what the film’s about.

        • Primer is much more puzzle-like and heady, but I enjoyed Coherence a lot more.

          • Balthazar Bee

            Haven’t seen Coherence yet, but it sounds amazing. Have you folks seen Primer‘s plot diagrammed?

            http://unrealitymag.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/primer-chart.jpg

          • The Heart Of A Gnu Generation

            Is Primer supposed to make sense? I thought the incomprehensible plot was the point of it after a while.

          • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

            No matter how many things i see, or read on that movie is still doesn’t make sense to me. I’ve seen it now like four times, and while i agree it is a good movie; it does sort of come off like a Saw movie where the score kicks up and we get mauled by sensory information signifying massive mind fuck-age.

          • The Heart Of A Gnu Generation

            I agree. I can admire the craft but at a certain point I just have to admit that the movie looses me. Whether it’s being deliberately obtuse, I don’t know.

          • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

            Going off of this, and his follow up; I think his style just looses me no matter what. By the time I’ve comprehended that several off-screen time jumps have happened the script goes twenty steps forward all at once, and i have no clue whats what.

          • The Heart Of A Gnu Generation

            I don’t remember much about Upstream Color, except for the pigs.

          • Hahahaha, holy shit. That’s amazing.

            My favorite diagram of Primer has always been this xkcd comic:

            https://xkcd.com/657/

    • lowRes_Triangle_Of_+1_Charisma

      mother! dir. Darren Affronsky

      This is a good movie. Also it’s one of those Rorschach test kind of films where the prevalent interpretation didn’t match my own at all. Also it becomes and interesting mash of horror, art-house, and dare i say your in-season CGI fueled roller-coaster ride style film. Personally, i’m thinking the conflict between maintaining the individuality of oneself versus the perpetual knock of the outside world (not unlike the savage in the novel, Brave New World). Also Affronsky wanted to destroy a house.

  • Conor Malcolm Crockford

    Drag Me To Hell I might need to give a second chance because I didn’t really love it when I saw it a few years ago. I do really like the analysis of it being about eating disorders too.

    Can we talk about how PERFECT the final shot Silence of the Lambs is? It’s scary and eerie and all the things you’d want out of it (I think it has a similarity to the final shot of The 39 Steps, correct me if I’m wrong).

    • The Ploughman

      I like Drag Me to Hell. Hadn’t heard the eating disorder interpretation. A few people tried to tie it to the financial crisis at the time (the curse comes about when a home loan is denied) but that’s clearly just a coincidence since the crisis came about because nobody was being denied home loans.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        Yeah there are a few pieces about it, mostly on how all the curse stuff is linked to food, how she never eats much, and her being pin pointed as a former “fat girl”.

        • The Ploughman

          Interesting eating disorders are a topic I’ve been doing a lot of research on of late. That certainly gives the movie a new wrinkle.

      • I believe Raimi has openly stated that the movie is an allegory about the financial crisis (I saw him say it SOMEWHERE, possibly an extra on the dvd itself).

    • pico

      It’s a movie that’s grown on me the further it’s removed from the hype, when it was billed as Master Horror Director Sam Raimi’s Big Return to the Genre, his first in a decade. It’s well-made, funny, and fleet. Ending is a bit obvious, but in the way that campfire horror stories sometimes are.

  • How did I miss that Night of the Living Dead was getting a Criterion release? I’m so pumped.

    • Balthazar Bee

      Criterion needs to pay Rubinstein his fucking blood money so we can get a decent HD release of Dawn.

  • Glorbes

    I might have to buy Night of the Living Dead today.

    • Glorbes

      There. I did it. I really can’t afford it, but it’s my most anticipated Criterion release for the year.

      • Balthazar Bee

        We’re only human, my friend.

  • The Heart Of A Gnu Generation

    Denzel Washington is great in Roman J Israel.

  • The Ploughman

    Since we’re talking Criterions, I needed some help to solve the last newsletter clue but I’m quite stoked about it. Quite stoked.
    http://i9.cmail20.com/ei/r/2C/1AE/9E3/075440/images/wacky_1-18.jpg

    • @disqus_7AOfmTpErb:disqus got it, and I should have.

      • The Ploughman

        Yeah, I was pretty embarassed when it was finally revealed to me. In my defense, that thing on the right kinda looks like a winking Dr. Seuss creature and made me doubt my initial interpretation.

        • The crosshatching is Universal Cartoon Standard for “ham,” so I got that, but I tried and failed with every variation of “rock” and somehow missed “boulder.” Sad really.

          • The Ploughman

            Rocky and… Hamwinkle? Nothing about this fits!”

  • Glorbes
    • Link just brings me to my inbox?

      • Glorbes

        Refresh

        • Dumbass me kept refreshing my inbox at first.

  • pico

    ‘Tis the season:

    Between Darkest Hour and Dunkirk, I didn’t understand Dunkirk. It’s a fine battle picture, but it’s very, very confusing. They constantly switch between night and day. I wasn’t familiar with Dunkirk in my history, and I didn’t know it’s in France. And they never explained it.

    • Conor Malcolm Crockford

      He saw Darkest Hour FIVE TIMES. WHY

      • The Ploughman

        Now, now. It’s possible he lives in a place where the movie never fucking goes away and soaks up an inordinate amount of limited screen time.

    • The Ploughman

      Ahahaha. My favorite hate reads of the year are back.

      “…I think Price Waterhouse did a good thing and did not fire the person whose fault it was, because it was literally a tragic mistake.”

      First of all, thank you Academy Rando for reminding us of the underreported deadly consequences of last year’s kerfuffle, when Oscar producers were forced to murder the production team of La La Land.

      “I actually got more out of the Scream movies as far as intellectual twists on horror films, and they’re making Get Out as this huge statement, and I don’t quite see the depth of it that other people are seeing. Another film I would have definitely put on my list is Mudbound.”

      “No idea why that one came to mind just now. Hey, did you know George Washington Carver invented peanut butter?”

      “…where I was not familiar with Dunkirk, I was also not familiar with the events from The Post…”

      I’m ready to make a connection between understanding the praise of Get Out and basic historical literacy.

      • pico

        Hey, did you know George Washington Carver invented peanut butter?

        Applause. Well, done.

        Like, this person is exactly the kind of person openly satirized in the movie. No wonder he didn’t fucking get it. Jesus.

  • YUGE

    Who watches anything off of discs anymore?