• Belated Comebacker

    Much like you, I cannot bear to part with Blu-Rays or DVDs. It’s just so nice to be able to ‘unplug’ (insomuch as one can unplug while watching a movie or TV show) and watch something, without having immediate access to the Internet in order to look something up, or see how the show/film was received when it was first released. That’s one of those pleasures you don’t get with streaming services, which have a tendency to queue up the next episode right away, or provide a plethora of links for the viewer to choose next.

    In short, there’s an overstimulation element which I don’t appreciate, so I’ll stick to my DVDs and Blu-Rays when I can.

  • The Ploughman

    Roku was a life-changing (well, at least media-consumption-changing) introduction to our household. We have one of those apparently rare non-HDMI requiring versions. The only difficulty the Ploughwoman and I run into is our thirst for sports. We can justify the MLB package because, for obscure personal reasons, we watch a lot of baseball. But if we didn’t have a family cable subscription that we could piggy-back onto for many of the sports apps, not sure how we would handle football season.

    • Son of Griff

      My mother-in-law had an old TV for 20 years, and we got the non HDMI version for her birthday 3 years ago year. Utterly changed the way she does home entertainment now. At 81 she’s more up to date on what’s playing on TV and contemporary films than I am. Amazon sent my wife and I a second one by mistake, which we use in the bedroom.

    • They seem to have stopped making them in the last few years.

    • DJ JD

      If you don’t get to keep that family cable subscription, I hear sling TV is pretty decent.

      • The Ploughman

        That’s definitely what we’d look into next. Might also have to listen to games on the *gasp* radio on occasion.

    • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

      I am trying to figure out football season myself and I am not happy with any of my options.

      • The Ploughman

        I don’t know from pros, but our college watching is covered by an antennae (for major network games), and various Roku channels, most (but not all) of which would be available in Sling TV packages. I’m not sure what the cost would be without the cable log-in for those channels, but I don’t think it would be great.

        • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

          I definitely need to get an antenna.

          The problem with Sling is that there doesn’t seem to be any way to get NFL or NFL Network without getting a combo package and the sports upgrade, which already puts you at $55 a month or so just for football. And Sunday Ticket raised its prices yet again; the first time I searched my location was only available for the “max” package which was $379. I need to see if I can find it cheaper– and the other problem is that it only allows “out of market games,” so if I wanted to see every game, I’d still need the antenna and Sling with ESPN.

          I really just want to see my team’s games.

          • silverwheel

            I personally am furious that the online subscription packages still limit you to only out-of-network games. I don’t have a regular tv, and use my computer for all of my music listening and movie watching (I have a really bitchin Altec Lansing sound system and a great audio codec on my motherboard), so why should I have to follow the cable & broadcasting rules? Like, I’m willing to pay the NFL/MLB/NHL directly to watch their games, why is this not allowed?

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            I just wanna watch my goddamn Saints each week! Why can’t I do that?

  • Drunk Napoleon

    *pops in DVD*

    What did you watch?

    *activates Director’s Commentary*

    • Drunk Napoleon

      Community, Season Two, Episode Nine, “Conspiracy Theories And Interior Design”
      “That is going to be the worst book I will ever read cover-to-cover.”

      “Damn it, Annie, have you been playing detective?! You were gonna Nancy Screw me out of my credit!”

      This is my top favourite Community episodes (Non-Gimmick Edition), with that Winger zinger at the top being a massive reason why. But also, it contains my absolute favourite Jeff beat: when he admits to Annie that he made up the entire class and has never seen Professor Professorson in his entire life, and has a massive shit-eating grin the entire time (apparently, this was Joel McHale’s idea, with Harmon’s original conception being Jeff just as awed as Annie). Not only is that twist bonkers in itself (and the episode lives up to it), the idea of Jeff being incredibly amused by reality bending for him is brilliant and such a Jeff thing to do.

      The finale is Jeff being annoyed and disturbed to find someone’s trying to teach him a lesson; it’s funny just as an acknowledgement of the ordinary Community plot and as a joke about sitcom lessons, but I also find it #relatable as a guy who somehow activates people’s parental instincts, which is sometimes helpful and sometimes as annoying as Jeff finds it.

      This episode is the first appearance of two ideas: firstly, it’s the first time Troy and Abed’s sense of play has escalated into genuine absurdity, to the point that you could make fun of it as Britta does. Secondly, it’s the first time the Dean’s desire to join the group in play has come to the fore (Jim Rash’s pathetic crying is solid gold). I think this kind of thing is what serves to make the series both more in-jokey and more sentimental, having a dramatic character whose goal is to join the group (on top of the blanket fort fun – who wouldn’t want to spend time somewhere that will break out into a massive blanket fort for no reason?).

      The Defenders, Episode Six, “Ashes, Ashes”
      I think that when I’m going into a show I know will be mediocre or bad, I shouldn’t review it episode-by-episode. Steven Universe was fun to review, because while I don’t tap into the creative vision, there is a consistent creative vision there, one that knows what the characters and show will and won’t do. This show doesn’t have that – I see now that what I mistook for morality (on either the characters’ or writers’ parts) are just genre levers the story is pulling. The things that happen don’t happen because the characters would plausibly do it, or as natural consequences for the action, or as an expression of a Theme; they just happen because that’s what’s supposed to happen in a superhero story.

      I find myself thinking of Todd Van Der Werff’s complaint about The Shield, that he didn’t know how the show wanted him to feel about Vic Mackey. I can answer that pretty easily – the show wants him to want to find out what happens to Vic. It pursued that relentlessly and above all other considerations, and that ended up allowing it to do things like “create lovable, fascinating characters” and “show a complex community” and even “say deep things about humanity and shit”. This show tries to pursue everything, and achieves nothing.

      • ZoeZ

        “Conspiracy Theories and Interior Design” is one of my favorite Community episodes too, and it has, hands-down, my favorite cold opening of the series, perfectly punctuated by Jeff’s enthusiastic, “I don’t know!” It’s just such a great escalating series of gags.

        “My family name was Professorberg, but we changed it when we were fleeing from the Nazis.”
        “Oh, I’m so sorry.”

        “Professor Professorson. Really? You’re going to commit to that?”
        “Commit to what, reality?”

        And it has one of my favorite collisions between A plot and B plot, which the show is always good at, as the Troy/Abed blanket fort city becomes the site of Jeff and Annie’s chase scene. Basically, the entire episode is perfect.

        The only reason I’m glad The Defenders exists is that it did spawn a hilarious ongoing joke on Alan Sepinwall’s Twitter back when Iron Fist came out and people were wringing their hands over whether or not they would have to watch it in order to understand The Defenders. “If I haven’t seen season eight of Psych, will I be able to follow Remembrance of Things Past?” was a personal favorite.

        • Drunk Napoleon

          That whole first act is just so much funnier when you know Jeff is bluffing the entire time. “Oh my god, this is the final lesson!”

      • DJ JD

        VDW: I think he nailed the problem I had with my first stab at Breaking Bad. The action was compelling but I really, really didn’t care about the characters. (Some of the sidenote flourishes like Skylar’s hypocrisy and Marie’s thankfully-dropped kleptomania sideplot didn’t help with that.) Turns out, you can’t go into these shows wanting to *like* the people in there. Who knew.

      • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

        I find myself thinking of Todd Van Der Werff’s complaint about The Shield, that he didn’t know how the show wanted him to feel about Vic Mackey. I can answer that pretty easily – the show wants him to want to find out what happens to Vic.

        This sort of encapsulates why Toddddddddd fell out of favor with me– this kind of expectation that a show should “tell you how to feel,” should reduce its moral complexities to black and white, Good and Bad. I can’t roll with people who think moral ambiguity in art is a problem. (Of course, in Toddddddddddddddd’s case, it really comes back to his problems with masculinity in the first place.)

        • “Tell me how how to feel” implies a static conception of character, too: a character is X and shall ever be X, and we can define X as Bad or Good. This is pretty much the opposite of good storytelling, where characters, or what we think of them, can change. Dutch wasn’t the same at the beginning of The Shield as he was at the end; and what all of us thought of Vic kept changing. This trend of criticizing by classifying characters treats all characters as if they were the most minor.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            It’s a real failure of imagination on multiple levels: Only being able to criticize by classifying characters; only being able to imagine characters as static; not being able to come to your own conclusions about characters.

            It’s dull (in more than one sense) and disengaged.

          • thesplitsaber

            ‘people who think moral ambiguity in art is a problem.’

            I always end up wondering about the morality of the viewer who makes that kind of argument. Like do you really not know how you feel about Vic murdering Terry?

    • Raw – I’m glad the “people were fainting in the aisles!” hype has passed, allowing me to enjoy this gloriously disgusting film on its own merits. It’s one of the brightest directorial debuts I’ve seen in a while, with plenty of style, great use of music and one hell of a performance from the leading actress. It slightly loses momentum a couple of times and the ending was a little too tidy for my liking, but the strengths far outweigh the weaknesses.

      Shin Godzilla – this was impressive: the monster action is stellar and this version of Godzilla is terrifying and unsettling, especially in its initial, immature form. It was also disappointing: the absolutely relentless political chatter felt overly cluttered and lacked the human interest that I like to run alongside the destruction in my monster movies. I’m sure some of the satire went over my head but the quickfire editing and baffling need to caption every character and location just felt exhausting to me. Still good, but not quite as good as I hoped.

      • Fresno Bob

        I was totally into the constant chatter and political machination in Shin Godzilla. I think it’s a valiant attempt to show how this type of crisis actually impacts a stratified society with democratic and bureaucratic layers. Also “My noodles are cold. I knew this job wouldn’t be easy.” I can understand why it would be off-putting, but to me this was a welcome change of pace from the usual characterizations in many of the Godzilla films. I like the goofier and wackier characters, but I get the sense they wanted to try something very different in this outing, and I’d say they succeeded. I suspect the tone of Shin Godzilla will be a one-off, though.

        • There were some great lighter moments in amongst the chatter – as well as the replacement PM lamenting his cold noodles, I loved the initial visit from three noncommital biologists – but early on I found myself thinking “I can’t wait for this to settle down a bit so I can relax and enjoy it” and that never happened. I think there are just some films where I can’t get into their rhythm, and that stopped me loving this one. Those early scenes of first-stage Godzilla slithering destructively through the city were chilling and awesome though.

          • Fresno Bob

            The gonzo first major attack is some choice Godzilla action too. Especially after the Americans drop their big-ass bombs, and Godzilla shoots fucking LASERS from his back.

    • Fresno Bob

      An episode of 30 Rock season six I had somehow missed! Jack decides he will fix Pete by forcing him to become an alpha male, all in an effort to overcome his own insecurities about a question on a self-evaluation. Also, Jenna is dressed up as Smurfette for a 5 second gag, and it was…terrifying.

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        Pete’s total pain when Jack makes his life actively worse is hilarious.

    • lgauge

      Extraordinary Stories: Not to be confused with Wild Tales, which for the most part has a very different tone. It took a while for this one to get interesting, which for a 4 hour running time might be a deal breaker for some people, but eventually it did. The third story is the weakest, though it’s bookended by a couple of lovely sequences and it does have the most (almost the only) formal beauty. The other two stories eventually get very involving as their digressions morph the tone and scope of their narratives into something very intriguing. I particularly liked how the first story suddenly becomes Rear Window for 15 minutes or so. One of the most distinguishing elements of the film is its almost complete reliance on narration. This seemed very gimmicky at first, but once you get used to it, it makes any appearance of dialogue, or even just silence, stand out in an almost remarkable way. The overall effect of the narration is that of transforming the film into something akin to both a silent film (with narration taking the place of intertitles) and a documentary. There are also some unusual formal tricks in the editing that every now and then creates some dynamism in the otherwise very simple visual style.

      As usual for me, the long running time was eventually able to create a stronger connection with the narratives and characters than I would otherwise have with material like this, which eventually made the stories more interesting than how they started. I wouldn’t name this among my favorite long features, but it has enough to offer that it’s worth resisting the impulse to wonder where it’s all going after the first hour. Ultimately, it’s also a lot easier to sit through than many other newer films with the same length, since, while there are occasional instances of slow cinema-like use of long static shots, the overall storytelling is fairly conventional and not really reliant on duration and time as a formal tool. It’s more a sense that, like with TV shows, the extended time we spend with the characters (and even the breaks when we follow someone else) gives them an eventual familiarity and emotional closeness with the audience that would otherwise be almost impossible to achieve.

    • Logan Lucky – Fun way to end the summer. I usually don’t like endings like this, where there’s a “what really happened” twist, as it usually feels like a cheat, but I was fine with it here. Everyone was likable and odd enough that I’ll take it. I was concerned that the whole movie would be mocking rednecks, yokels, etc, and it largely stayed away from those tropes – the exception being Joe Bang & esp his brothers (who were meant to be idiots in general). Also, having seen mopey Bond in Spectre recently, it was a blast to see Craig get to ham it up. Seth MacFarlane & Sebastian Stan were largely useless, though, and I think they could’ve been removed without missing or affecting anything. I’m glad Soderbergh is spending his retirement doing something he loves.

      • Miller

        Storywise, I think you have a point about MacFarlane and Stan — outside of helping to incite the plan, MacFarlane doesn’t do much and Stan is along for the ride, what seems to be an obstacle in the heist is more of a fake-out. But I liked them a lot as part of the periphery that comes into play, it is very Westlakian in tone, and their casting is (like in the rest of the movie) spot on — Stan nails the forcibly bland handsomeness of a guy who has to answer to sponsors and MacFarlane of course is effortlessly irritating.

      • ZoeZ

        That spoiler makes me want a version of Logan Lucky where the end, for no apparent reason, is structured like the end of Clue.

        • NASCAR’s just a red herring.

    • ZoeZ

      The Leftovers, the first two episodes of season two. Shifting the action to “Miracle,” the most populous town with no departures and now a refuge for our main cast, is a great decision and leads to not only some of the show’s best, eeriest worldbuilding–the national park set-up in the second episode is especially phenomenal, but I also loved the casual goat sacrifice and the wristbands signifying local or non-local status–but also to some great freshness. Guy Montag-ish firemen who start fires! Mysterious disappearances and lakes being drained overnight! And the human center of Kevin, Nora, and Jill is really moving, especially as we see them confess to each other, and see Jill and Nora growing closer (Jill defending Nora to her dad was heartwarming).

    • Delmars Whiskers

      Logan Lucky–Just a thorough damned delight. Maybe a wee bit overlong, but that’s probably because Soderbergh is more interested in hanging out with his characters than advancing the plot. Plenty of big laughs, but I admit I actually teared up at one point, too.

      The Killing–Now here’s a heist movie that doesn’t give a shit about anything else. An ace cast, a damn near perfect script and Kubrick’s cutting is a joy–I especially love how he TWICE dissolves to another scene while Timothy Carey is still talking. Awful music, though.

      • The Killing is so great. So many amazing little touches, like the big tough guy being a chess enthusiast, and the role that a cute dog plays in the final scenes.

        • Delmars Whiskers

          And the casting is so perfect, you understand everyone’s backstories without explanation. Why was Sterling Hayden in prison? We’re not told, but we can make a pretty good guess. Why is Ted de Corsia in hock to the mob? Just look at him and you know.

          • I always love seeing Elisha Cook Jr in anything, too. He’s got that perfect panicked / paranoid look, ideal for small-time hoods and bit-part weirdos.

          • The Ploughman

            Elisha Cook Jr is perfect casting in this, a guy who gets our sympathy as quickly as Hayden gets our fear.

          • Miller

            Bogart sneering at Cook in Maltese Falcon is like a math equation — plug in Bogie’s face plus Cook’s face and this is the only possible result.

      • Miller

        I could’ve done without Hayden wearing that stupid sweater the whole time though.

        • Delmars Whiskers

          Yeah, but he looked cool with sunglasses.

    • jroberts548

      Finished The Defenders, season 1. I liked it. After the bloat of the first 1.75 episodes at least, it moved at a reasonable pace, the character interactions made sense, and the fights ranged from okay to pretty good. The clash between Daredevil’s sincerity and Jessica’s aloofness was probably my favorite dynamic, especially when Matt tries to get really heartfelt before the final battle.

      There are some things that didn’t really make sense – the physics involved in the implosion, how Elektra had enough of her personality back to not be a mindless lackey, but not enough back to not be evil- but nothing that was show destroying. Finn Jones is still not good.Seeing him with different showrunners confirms that, but also that Scott Buck accentuated his weaknesses as an actor in Iron Fist. Based on early word around Inhumans, I hope marvel has learned its lesson.

      WHAS:10YL, end of season. I liked it, but it wasn’t as funny as the movie or first day of camp. I got a real kick out of their commitment to the incredibly stupid twist. Also I enjoyed david Hyde pierce’s cameo, but I wish he was there more. He’s truly a great underrated comic actor.

      US Open: Federer v. Del Potro: The Roger-Dämmerung. Del potro played out of his mind on serve and forehands. Federer gave up about 4 points on shots that he has made successfully 10,000 times. Argentine tennis fans in New York are obnoxious.

      • All tennis fans in NYC are obnoxious. It’s why some players hate it here and some thrive.

        And how about that all-American women’s semis? It’s like 1980 all over again!

      • Miller

        Pierce very successfully made me think he didn’t give a shit about his cameo, he was hilarious.

        • jroberts548

          Grabbing one of his emmys as he walked out was great.

          It is possible that pierce isn’t in more things post-Frasier because he doesn’t want to be.

          • Conor Malcolm Crockford

            As far as I know he does a lot of stage work and is mostly fine at that level (He’s a joy in The Perfect Host but it’s not a good movie.)

    • I marked the 25th anniversary of B:TAS with three episodes. “Heart of Ice” is the first one I ever saw all those years ago, and while there are a few plot holes, it still packs an emotional punch. It’s also the first Dini-Timm pairing, the beginning of a beautiful friendship. “Appointment in Crime Alley,” adapted by comic and TV writer Gerry Conway from Denny O’Neil’s original comic, is a bit scattershot, with some odd moments here and there, but fairly strong dialogue and an emotional payoff of its own. Both of these reflect the desire of B:TAS’s first showrunners’ desire to have Batman fight for economic and social justice as much as criminal justice, as the bad guy in both is a rich hypocritical business.

      “Almost Got ‘Im” is a more conventional villain episode with pretty much all the major B:TAS villains and is another sterling Dini script.

      • Fresno Bob

        Demon’s Quest and the one with Jonah Hex are two other favourites of mine. I guess I just really like Ra’s Al Ghul when he’s voiced by David Warner.

        • Delmars Whiskers

          The first half of Demon’s Quest, especially, has some of my favorite color styling in the whole series.

        • Jason Isaacs did a good job as Ra’s in Under the Red Hood. But David Warner makes everything better.

        • DJ JD

          Everyone knows about Hamill’s Joker by now, but honestly, that show set up so many of my mental go-to templates for those characters. Ledger!Joker was phenomenal, of course, but he never was my “main” Joker, the closest realization of my own internal platonic ideal. That was always Hamill’s DCAU take on him, by a mile. The same is true of nearly all of the other characters, including Bats himself.

          • The only voice work on the show that I don’t find perfect are Catwoman and Batgirl. Not bad, but not in the same league as everyone else.

          • DJ JD

            Now that you mention it, Harley’s the only one that really “popped” for me as far as the females go. Other DCAU shows had this problem too, as I think about it.

          • Dana Delaney was amazing as Lois, and there were a few great casting choices in JLU. But not much else.

          • Delmars Whiskers

            Oh, I think JL always did a great job with Wonder Woman. And Hawkgirl got a great arc.

          • Miller

            AHEM. CCH goddamn Pounder! Also, Amy Acker does a great job as Huntress.

          • I did say JLU. Huntress came to mind, but I had forgotten it’s the amazing Amy Acker (the main reason I plan to try The Gifted).

          • Conor Malcolm Crockford

            Question and Huntress forever.

          • thesplitsaber

            Also amazing in Mask of the Phantasm

          • Delmars Whiskers

            Well, in fairness, one of the big problems with the Catwoman episodes was that they were farmed out to the crappiest overseas animation studios. The Cat And The Claw, especially, would probably play much better without the stilted movement and off-model character designs.

          • Fresno Bob

            I liked Catwoman, but it’s probably because I love Adrienne Barbeau.

          • Delmars Whiskers

            Paul Williams as The Penguin, John Glover as The Riddler–they would be perfect casting choices in live action as well.

          • Oh no, now I want a 70s Batman film, starring Paul Williams as the Penguin and directed by Brian De Palma, in the same style as Phantom of the Paradise. You monster.

          • Delmars Whiskers

            I’d settle for the Joe Dante Batman movie we almost got in the eighties.

          • Miller

            !!!!! What?! That sounds amazing, if only for the strong possibility of Dick Miller as Commissioner Gordon.

          • Fresno Bob

            There could be no better choice.

          • Delmars Whiskers

            And John Hora bathing the sets in primary colors!

          • Williams was such an out of the box choice. A perfect voice for melding the too-grotesque DeVito version with the classic Shakespeare-quoting character.

      • Delmars Whiskers

        The Man Who Killed Batman (directed by Timm) and Read My Lips are two more great episodes. Actually, by the back half of its run, the good episodes way outnumbered the bad.

        • There are maybe a dozen episodes that I would call bad, almost all in the first 30 or so (the exceptions being Baby Doll and the one with the mutated farm animals near the end of the final season). And none but that last one and the one with homeless community underground are un-rewatchable.

          • Delmars Whiskers

            Oh, I love Baby Doll. I’ve Got Batman In My Basement and The Cat And The Claw (a two-parter, ugh) are my unwatchable episodes. It seems Catwoman regularly gets the short end of the stick–Cat Scratch Fever and Tyger, Tyger are also pretty blah.

          • You know how Catwoman was originally an animal rights activist, right? It took a while to get that out of her DNA and make her Catwoman again. Really, the only great moments she got were the one with her and Nightwing teaming up and the silent short that was on the DVD with the utterly forgettable “Mystery of the Batwoman.”

        • Miller

          Man Who Killed Batman might be my favorite episode and has one of the great title cards:
          http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-2sg8bsYozLg/URFEJ4TU6jI/AAAAAAAAPcE/aDDXFmytGoU/s1600/Batman+-+The+Animated+Series.jpg

      • Defense Against The Dark Arts

        25 years!? Boy, I’m old. I remember recording the commercial for the premiere episode and playing it back multiple times. In fact, here it is now:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I65ecFZm8Qg

      • Drunk Napoleon

        “Almost Got ‘Im” gave me and my best friend a meme.

        *gravelly voice* “I threw a rock!:

      • Conor Malcolm Crockford

        “I HIT ‘EM WITH A ROCK!”

      • thesplitsaber

        ‘Half of me wants to strangle you.’

        ‘And what does the other half want to do?’

        ‘Hit you with a truck’

        ‘…we used to date’

        ‘ahhhhhhhhh.’

        I also love the reveal of Batman with the light bulb swinging showing Croc in the light and the cape and cowl in the silhouette.

    • RockNRolla–Douchebags, The Movie. The credits promise the cast’s return in a sequel, but who cares? I certainly wouldn’t want to spend another minute with these characters and their casual homophobia and glamorous disregard for pretty much every single good thing in the world. I suppose after Snatch, two Sherlock Holmes movies, and this, it’s time for me to admit that I just don’t like Guy Ritchie movies.

      • Delmars Whiskers

        I’m not usually a Ritchie admirer at all, but I absolutely love Man From UNCLE.

        • I’ve heard good things about it, but I dunno, I didn’t even like Snatch, which is supposed to be one of the Ritchie movies people like.

          • I remember quite liking it at the time (don’t think I’ve seen it since the VHS era!) but it would not surprise me at all if it hasn’t aged well. Ritchie’s style seems to date really badly.

          • I mean, it’s the best of the Ritchie movies that I’ve seen, but I still don’t really like it. I could at least see what people like about Snatch, though, which I’m struggling to do with RockNRolla.

          • Ruck Cohlchez 🌹

            Yeah, same here. I suspect Snatch is best described as “The best of the movies that ripped off Pulp Fiction while lacking the substance behind the hyper-cool gloss and stylish violence.”

          • Delmars Whiskers

            UNCLE plays as homage to the Eurotrash spy movies of the sixties. If you love those like I do, you’ll have a blast.

          • I haven’t seen a lot of them. But that’s intriguing.

      • pico79

        I’m a little lighter on RockNRolla‘s homophobia because it reminds me a lot of the kind of environment I came out of: friends were casually homophobic in language, then after I literally came out, they had trouble shaking that but were also weirdly protective of me. The way it’s played in the film reminds me a lot of that dynamic, and I found that aspect of the movie kind of endearing. I think it helps that Hardy plays it with such serious vulnerability, too.

        Everything else, though – I agree. He’s not for me.

        • That’s fair. Being straight, all I see are a bunch of jerks like the ones I grew up around who never had to adjust like you’re talking about. I like what you’re saying about the specific situation here, though, so I might be more charitable toward it if I ever were to watch this again, which is not likely.

          • pico79

            I mean, you’re not wrong at all.

    • Miller

      Bitch 23 — let’s hear it for the comedic stylings of James Van Der Beek, who is apparently legit jacked — him delivering dialogue in various stages of lifting and flexing becomes funnier and funnier.

      • Van Der Beek is such a great presence in that show. It’s such a great performance, and it easily could have been lazy and irritating, but somehow he makes it charming and hilarious.

    • The Narrator

      Rear Window: God, this movie owns so fucking hard.

      Hannah Takes the Stairs, w/ commentary by Joe Swanberg, Greta Gerwig, and Kent Osbourne: A bunch of people talking for 80 minutes over a movie that’s basically a bunch of people talking for 80 minutes, but I found the commentary much more entertaining than the film proper. The details of the production are fun and interesting, and all three participants have a really nice rapport that keeps the track moving. And a tangent about Osbourne having a trick he can do with his penis (one of many) cryptically named “The Birth of a Nation” is actually funnier than anything in the movie.

      • I really wish Grace Kelly had done more Hitchcock. She’s always such a damn delight in his movies.

        • And it probably would have meant she wasn’t in an emotionally abusive marriage?

        • thesplitsaber

          I just wish she had been in more movies period.